Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chemistry The combining capacity of an atom or radical determined by the number of electrons that it will lose, add, or share when it reacts with other atoms.
  • n. Chemistry A positive or negative integer used to represent this capacity: The valences of copper are 1 and 2.
  • n. The number of binding sites of a molecule, such as an antibody or antigen.
  • n. The ability of a substance to interact with another or to produce an effect.
  • n. Psychology The degree of attraction or aversion that an individual feels toward a specific object or event.
  • n. Linguistics The number of arguments that a lexical item, especially a verb, can combine with to make a syntactically well-formed sentence, often along with a description of the categories of those constituents. Intransitive verbs (appear, arrive) have a valence of one—the subject; some transitive verbs (paint, touch), two—the subject and direct object; other transitive verbs (ask, give), three—the subject, direct object, and indirect object.
  • n. The capacity of something to unite, react, or interact with something else: "I do not claim to know much more about novels than the writing of them, but I cannot imagine one set in the breathing world which lacks any moral valence” ( Robert Stone).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An extract; a preparation.
  • n. The combining capacity of an atom, radical or functional group determined by the number of electrons that it will lose, gain, or share when it combines with other atoms etc
  • n. The number of binding sites of a molecule, such as an antibody or antigen
  • n. The number of arguments that a verb can have, including the subject of the verb in the counting, ranging from zero (for the likes of "It rains") to three (for the likes of "He gives her a flower").
  • n. A one-dimensional value assigned to an object, situation, or state, that can usually be positive or negative
  • n. value
  • n. Alternative spelling of valance.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The degree of combining power of an atom (or radical) as shown by the number of atoms of hydrogen (or of other monads, as chlorine, sodium, etc.) with which it will combine, or for which it can be substituted, or with which it can be compared; thus, an atom of hydrogen is a monad, and has a valence of one; the atoms of oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon are respectively dyads, triads, and tetrads, and have a valence respectively of two, three, and four.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • See valance.
  • n. In chem., the relative saturating or combining capacity of an atom compared with the standard hydrogen atom; the quality or force which determines the number of atoms with which any single atom will chemically unite.
  • n. In biology: Form value; morphological value or equivalency. See morphic.
  • n. In zoology, taxonomic value or equivalency; classificatory grade or rank of a zoölogical group.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (biology) a relative capacity to unite or react or interact as with antigens or a biological substrate
  • n. (chemistry) a property of atoms or radicals; their combining power given in terms of the number of hydrogen atoms (or the equivalent)

Etymologies

Latin valentia, capacity, from valēns, valent-, present participle of valēre, to be strong.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In a specific context of a jurisdiction where you have high levels of funding and relatively strong unions, the main valence of union power is going to be to shift education policies at the margin in the interests of the teachers rather than in the public interest.

    Matthew Yglesias » By Request: Teacher’s Unions

  • Mulliken has been deeply interested in valence theory and molecular structure.

    Robert S. Mulliken - Biography

  • Future research could address this issue by using the same stimuli in a word valence task and a prosody memory task but separating them by several days.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • However, only in one test phase was this judgment followed by a word valence rating.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • In either case, however, the word valence effect would depend on and therefore correlate with the participants 'memory for prosody.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Participants performed the word valence judgment on a different set of words than the prosody memory task.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Participants were informed about the word valence rating only when commencing the word recognition test in the actual experiment.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • More importantly, however, the latter value failed to correlate with the word valence effect.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Participants were informed about the word valence rating and the prosody memory task only when commencing the respective test block in the actual experiment.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • If prosody modulates word valence during memory encoding or consolidation, memory for prosody should be irrelevant and hence may not correlate with the word valence effect.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

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