Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To prophesy; foretell. See Synonyms at foretell.
  • intransitive v. To be a prophet.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. to predict or foretell (future events).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • v. To prophesy; to foretell; to practice prediction; to utter prophecies.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To prophesy; foretell; practise prediction.
  • To prophesy; utter prophetically or as a prophet; foretell.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. foretell through or as if through the power of prophecy
  • v. predict or reveal through, or as if through, divine inspiration

Etymologies

Latin vāticinārī, vāticināt-, from vātēs, seer; see vatic.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin vāticinātus, perfect passive participle of vāticinor ("foretell, prophesy"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Paul, I vaticinate that the mansuetude of your response will bring out the best of my muliebrity.

    Save the language! « Write Anything

  • You may see my attitude as defensive and oppugnant, but I vaticinate further derogation of our incomparable tongue should such complots be permitted to unfold without denunciation.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • Semblably Titus Livius writeth that, in the solemnization time of the Bacchanalian holidays at Rome, both men and women seemed to prophetize and vaticinate, because of an affected kind of wagging of the head, shrugging of the shoulders, and jectigation of the whole body, which they used then most punctually.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • The unique appeal of the great mythological compositions of the Renaissance results ultimately from the fact that, whether they smile or vaticinate, they are shining through veils: Vela faciunt honorem secreti.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

  • I am reassured, however, by the reflection that I am not expected to look into the future and vaticinate.

    A Royalist Fiasco

  • By this means alone, the divinity of Jesus Christ and the truth of our holy religion has been established in many minds; for it is not in the power of mortals thus to vaticinate future events.

    The Revelation Explained

  • But Gwyneth and I are not uncomfortably provided for, and I no longer contribute paragraphs of gossip to the Pimlico Postboy, nor yet do I vaticinate in the columns of the Tipster.

    In the Wrong Paradise

  • No less futile were it to waste declamatory tears upon the strife of absolutism with new-fledged democracy, or to vaticinate a reign of socialistic terror for the immediate future.

    Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 The Catholic Reaction

  • Rachel, whatever they might be as respected his secret intention; yet as the children vaticinate from the examination of each other's tongues, if the uncle had examined the organ, he might have discovered some of those blue lines which produce an exclamation from the young augurs.

    Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume XXII

  • Bacchanalian holidays at Rome, both men and women seemed to prophetize and vaticinate, because of an affected kind of wagging of the head, shrugging of the shoulders, and jectigation of the whole body, which they used then most punctually.

    Gargantua and Pantagruel, Illustrated, Book 3

Wordnik is becoming a not-for-profit! Read our announcement here.

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.