Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who works for wages.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The wage-worker sells his labour-power to the owner of land, factories and instruments of labour.

    Archive 2006-08-01

  • A careful survey of all the wage-literature published shows that the wage-worker who gets $1500 is an extraordinary, a unique, exception. '

    Class-Consciousness and the 'Movies'

  • Will they ever find one as long as the wage-worker carries in his bosom a rankling sense of injury done him?

    Monopolies and the People

  • The wage-worker found himself confronted with the fact that he was soon to lose entirely the benefit of competition for the purchase of his work, and felt that his only salvation from practical slavery was to prevent the competition between himself and his comrades from forcing his wages down to the starvation point.

    Monopolies and the People

  • If a labor union does wrong, we oppose it as firmly as we oppose a corporation which does wrong; and we stand equally stoutly for the rights of the man of wealth and for the rights of the wage-worker.

    Theodore Roosevelt and His Times

  • Do justice to the rich man and exact justice from him; do justice to the poor man and exact justice from him -- justice to the capitalist and justice to the wage-worker ....

    Theodore Roosevelt and His Times

  • In short, the wage-worker is better off, has more advantages, greater opportunities, and is yearly becoming a more important factor in the Government.

    The American Architect and Building News, Vol. 27, Jan-Mar, 1890

  • The welfare of the wage-worker, the welfare of the tiller of the soil, upon these depend the welfare of the entire country; their good is not to be sought in pulling down others; but their good must be the prime object of all our statesmanship.

    Standard Selections A Collection and Adaptation of Superior Productions From Best Authors For Use in Class Room and on the Platform

  • The chief factor in the success of each man -- wage-worker, farmer, and capitalist alike -- must ever be the sum total of his own individual qualities and abilities.

    State of the Union Address (1790-2001)

  • The question of securing a healthy, self-respecting, and mutually sympathetic attitude as between employer and employe, capitalist and wage-worker, is a difficult one.

    State of the Union Address (1790-2001)

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