Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of wych-elm.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See wych-elm.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The winged elm or wahoo.
  • n. Occasionally, and improperly, applied to the witch-hazel.
  • n. An elm. Ulmus montana, of hilly districts in western and northern Europe and northern Asia; the common wild elm of Scotland, Ireland, and the northern and western parts of England.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. Eurasian elm often planted as a shade tree

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I shall be obliged to any of your correspondents who can inform me from whence came the term _witch-elm_, a name given to a species of elm tree, to distinguish it from the common elm.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 377, June 27, 1829

  • Perigal tea beneath the shade of a witch-elm on the lawn.

    Sparrows: the story of an unprotected girl

  • From out a screen of hazel and witch-elm (almost directly in front of the place where the truck, that morning, had been loaded) crashed a right hideous object.

    Further Adventures of Lad

  • Mounting on an old dwarf witch-elm about seven feet high, where several could sit, he would hold forth.

    Life of William Carey

  • On the witch-elm that shades Saint Fillan's spring,

    Lady of the Lake

  • But I have tied red thread round the bairns's throats, "(so her fondness still called them,)" and given ilka ane of them a riding-wand of rowan-tree, forby sewing up a slip of witch-elm into their doublets; and I wish to know of your reverence if there be ony thing mair that a lone woman can do in the matter of ghosts and fairies?

    The Monastery

  • On the witch-elm that shades Saint Fillan's spring

    The Lady of the Lake

  • But I have tied red thread round the bairns’s throats,” (so her fondness still called them,) “and given ilka ane of them a riding-wand of rowan-tree, forby sewing up a slip of witch-elm into their doublets; and I wish to know of your reverence if there be ony thing mair that a lone woman can do in the matter of ghosts and fairies? —

    The Monastery

  • I have taught her to draw, -- an accomplishment in which I am not without skill, -- and she has already taken a sketch from nature, which, barring the perspective, is not so amiss; indeed, she has caught the notion of "idealizing" (which promises future originality) from her own natural instincts, and given to the old witch-elm, that hangs over the stream, just the bough that it wanted to dip into the water and soften off the hard lines.

    The Caxtons — Complete

  • "I have tied red thread round the bairns 'throats, and given ilk ane of them a riding-wand of rowan-tree, forbye sewing up a slip of witch-elm into their doublets; and I wish to know of your reverence if there be onything mair that a lone woman can do in the matter of ghosts and fairies?

    The Book of Hallowe'en

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