Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or pertaining to words; verbal; wordy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Respecting words; full of words; wordy.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Verbal; wordy.

Etymologies

From word +‎ -ish. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The seeds for new things bookish and wordish; and the challenge will be to see how they transplant to the various soils of the region, cross-pollinated with local partnerships.

    Mabuhay!

  • A perfect picture I say, for hee yeeldeth to the powers of the minde an image of that whereof the Philosopher bestoweth but a wordish description, which doth neither strike, pearce, nor possesse, the sight of the soule so much, as that other doth.

    Defence of Poesie

  • A perfect picture, I say; for he yieldeth to the powers of the mind an image of that whereof the philosopher bestoweth but a wordish description: which doth neither strike, pierce, nor possess the sight of the soul so much as that other doth.

    English literary criticism

  • A perfect picture, I say; for he yieldeth to the powers of the mind an image of that whereof the philosopher bestoweth but a wordish description, which doth neither strike, pierce, nor possess the sight of the soul so much as that other doth.

    The Defense of Poesy

  • Many of the writers here on Alternet like to indulge themselves in pointless verbiage and clever, but overwrought, turns of wordish phrase that obfuscate the point and render the article difficult to read.

    WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

  • But if all these words look wordish, sound wordish, and act wordish, why are they all hedged about with the namby-pamby "I know it's not a real word" disclaimers?

    Peter Black's Freedom to Differ

  • - I4v - an affinitie in the wordish consideration, that I think this digression will make my meaning receive the fuller understanding: which is not to take upon me to teach Poets how they should do, but only finding my selfe sicke among the rest, to shew some one or two spots of the common infection growne among the most part of writers; that acknowledging our selves somewhat awry, wee may bende to the right use both of matter and manner.

    Defence of Poesie

  • But what? methinks I deserve to be pounded, for straying from poetry to oratory: but both have such an affinity in this wordish consideration, that I think this digression will make my meaning receive the fuller understanding: which is not to take upon me to teach poets how they should do, but only finding myself sick among the rest, to show some one or two spots of the common infection, grown among the most part of writers: that, acknowledging ourselves somewhat awry, we may bend to the right use both of matter and manner; whereto our language giveth us great occasion, being indeed capable of any excellent exercising of it.

    English literary criticism

  • But both have such an affinity in the wordish consideration, that I think this digression will make my meaning receive the fuller understanding: —which is not to take upon me to teach poets how they should do, but only, finding myself sick among the rest, to show some one or two spots of the common infection grown among the most part of writers; that, acknowledging ourselves somewhat awry, we may bend to the right use both of matter and manner: whereto our language giveth us great occasion, being, indeed, capable of any excellent exercising of it.

    The Defense of Poesy

  • 'presto' is Italian and presumably others of the 'wordish' words listed above are valid words

    Visual Thesaurus : Online Edition

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