Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A native or inhabitant of Bohemia.
  • noun A person of Bohemian ancestry.
  • noun The Czech dialects of Bohemia.
  • noun Archaic A Romani person.
  • noun An itinerant person; a vagabond.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun countable A native or resident of Bohemia.
  • noun uncountable The dialect of the Czech language spoken in Bohemia.
  • noun countable, archaic A Gypsy, a Romani.
  • noun countable, slang A marginalized and impoverished young artist, or member of the urban literati.
  • adjective Of, or relating to Bohemia or its language.
  • adjective Of, or relating to the untraditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, musicians, and actors in major European cities (or by extension, major North American cities as well).

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Sense 3, translation of French bohémien; see bohemian.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Bohemia +‎ -ian

Examples

  • He had a taste for literature and a longing for travel and military adventure in especial, and for a time he lived a pleasant, free and easy, Bohemian sort of life, if we may use the term Bohemian in describing days that existed long before Henri

    A History of the Four Georges and of William IV, Volume III (of 4)

  • It was what they call a Bohemian party, I'm told - meaning that they could all drink as much as they liked without any servants to tell tales on them.

    Best Detective Stories

  • Francis had required all the firmness of what he called his Bohemian head to resist the threats, entreaties, and cajoleries employed to get him to acquiesce in the dethronement of the King of Saxony, and the wiping out of the

    Complete Project Gutenberg Collection of Memoirs of Napoleon

  • Francis had required all the firmness of what he called his Bohemian head to resist the threats, entreaties, and cajoleries employed to get him to acquiesce in the dethronement of the King of Saxony, and the wiping out of the Saxon nationality by the very alliance which professed to fight only for the rights of nations and of their lawful sovereigns.

    The Memoirs of Napoleon

  • Francis had required all the firmness of what he called his Bohemian head to resist the threats, entreaties, and cajoleries employed to get him to acquiesce in the dethronement of the King of Saxony, and the wiping out of the

    Memoirs of Napoleon — Complete

  • LAMB: Did you call the Bohemian Grove and say, "I'd like to come"?

    Them: Adventures with Extremists

  • "This is truly Bohemian," remarked Mrs. Clyde, as with a newspaper for both plate and napkin, she joined the group about the fire, "-- much more so than the studio-luncheons they call Bohemian in Boston."

    Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party

  • By a curious perversion of language, on account of various gypsies who about two centuries ago travelled westward across Bohemia and thereby came to be known in France as "Bohemians," the word Bohemian came into use to designate one who lived an easy, careless life, unhampered by serious responsibilities.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

  • I suggested to my American friends that the abandonment of the word Bohemian in its historical sense might well extend to its literary and figurative sense.

    What I Saw in America

  • Erectione Crucis_, etc. He wrote in Latin, Bohemian, and German, and recently his Bohemian writings have been edited by K.J. Erben, Prague

    Books Fatal to Their Authors

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