Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A member of an originally mendicant Roman Catholic religious order founded by St. Francis of Assisi in 1209 and dedicated to the virtues of humility and poverty. It is now divided into three independent branches.
  • adjective Of or relating to Saint Francis of Assisi or to the order founded by him.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Belonging to the order of St. Francis; of or pertaining to the Franciscans.
  • noun One of an order of mendicant friars founded by St. Francis of Assisi, Italy, authorized by the pope in 1210 and more formally ratified in 1223.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective (R. C. Ch.) Belonging to the Order of St. Francis of the Franciscans.
  • adjective pious laymen who devote themselves to useful works, such as manual labor schools, and other educational institutions; -- called also Brothers of the Third Order of St. Francis.
  • adjective nuns who follow the rule of St. Francis, esp. those of the Second Order of St. Francis, -- called also Poor Clares or Minoresses.
  • adjective the Third Order of St. Francis.
  • noun (R.C.Ch.) A monk or friar of the Order of St. Francis, a large and zealous order of mendicant monks founded in 1209 by St. Francis of Assisi. They are called also Friars Minor; and in England, Gray Friars, because they wear a gray habit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A monk or nun belonging to the religious order founded by St Francis of Assisi.
  • adjective Pertaining to St Francis or to the Franciscans.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan order
  • adjective of or relating to Saint Francis of Assisi or to the order founded by him

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[New Latin Franciscānus, from Medieval Latin Franciscus, from Saint Francis of Assisi.]

Examples

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