Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A person who has retired into seclusion for religious reasons.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See anchoret.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Same as anchoret.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun One who lives in isolation or seclusion, especially for religious reasons.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun one retired from society for religious reasons

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin anchōrīta, from Late Latin anachōrēta, from Late Greek anakhōrētēs, from anakhōrein, to retire : ana-, ana- + khōrein, to make room for, withdraw (from khōros, place; see ghē- in Indo-European roots).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek ἀναχωρητής (anakhōrētēs, "anchoret"), from ἀναχωρέω (anakhōreō, "I withdraw, retire"), via Latin anachorēta ("anchorite").

Examples

  • Applying the term anchorite to me is perhaps a juster comparison than you think.

    The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters

  • Applying the term anchorite to me is perhaps a juster comparison than you think.

    The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters

  • Applying the term anchorite to me is perhaps a juster comparison than you think.

    The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters

  • The only room which suggested nothing of the anchorite was the dressing-room, furnished with all the comforts and conveniences necessary to an elegant and fastidious man of the world.

    The French Immortals Series — Complete

  • The only room which suggested nothing of the anchorite was the dressing-room, furnished with all the comforts and conveniences necessary to an elegant and fastidious man of the world.

    Zibeline — Complete

  • The only room which suggested nothing of the anchorite was the dressing - room, furnished with all the comforts and conveniences necessary to an elegant and fastidious man of the world.

    Zibeline — Volume 2

  • O'Brien's biographer Anthony Cronin notes of his student days that most of his friends "regarded him as a natural celibate, even a kind of anchorite ... the cells of whose hermitage were the pubs, from which women were for the most part debarred."

    Oblomov in Dublin

  • 'anchorite' passed his lonely existence in the spot in question.

    Chatterbox, 1905.

  • My writing partner is pretty much an anchorite, and she seems to do pretty well. * g* (Hi, Sarah!)

    April 22nd, 2009

  • The anchorite in the Syrian desert, subsisting on locusts and honey, does not react to being on his own the same way as the socialite suddenly abandoned for one reason or another by his or her acquaintances and who can no longer frequent the scenes of gaiety that gave meaning to his or her life.

    In Chile, the Lessons of Isolation

Comments

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  • "When Henry David Thoreau escaped Concord and retired to Walden Pond to lead by example and live as an anchorite in the woods, demanding that people start their lives anew, he was not only passing judgement on the society of Concord, he was consciously enacting a peculiarly American story."

    —James Campbell, The Final Frontiersman (New York and London: Atria Books, 2004), 152

    September 17, 2008