Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or relating to the literary works of John Milton
  • adjective Of a style comparable to that of Milton's writing

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Milton +‎ -ic

Examples

  • I then proceeded to consider the second hypothesis, which I termed the Miltonic hypothesis, not because it is of any particular consequence whether John Milton seriously entertained it or not, but because it is stated in a clear and unmistakable manner in his great poem.

    Lectures and Essays

  • I then proceeded to consider the second hypothesis, which I termed the Miltonic hypothesis, not because it is of any particular consequence whether John Milton seriously entertained it or not, but because it is stated in a clear and unmistakable manner in his great poem.

    Lectures on Evolution

  • I then proceeded to consider the second hypothesis, which I termed the Miltonic hypothesis, not because it is of any particular consequence to me whether John Milton seriously entertained it or not, but because it is stated in a clear and unmistakable manner in his great poem.

    American Addresses, with a Lecture on the Study of Biology

  • He might not have "made the word Miltonic mean sublime," but we can spare a little of the sublime to get some more of the beautiful.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 098, February, 1876

  • I wouldn't say that my current purpose is all that Miltonic, that is, I don't feel compelled, exactly, to "justify the ways of God to man," but lately I do feel a pressing need to mitigate some of the nonsense that we habitually lay on the invisible God, presuming, as we seem to do, that He is the only one who has acted in every case.

    Scott Cairns: Death and Dying: Reflections on Suffering and Loss

  • In the first lecture the Professor stated the subject and formally put out of court the theory that the world is eternal upon circumstantial evidence, and then proceeded to put out in the same way and upon the same evidence, the idea that the world was created in six days, which he was pleased to call the Miltonic hypothesis.

    Fifty Years in the Gospel Ministry from 1864 to 1914. Twenty-seven Years in the Pastorate; Sixteen Years' Active Service as Chaplain in the U. S. Army; Seven Years Professor in Wilberforce University; Two Trips to Europe; A Trip in Mexico.

  • For (and here was his difference from most men, here was what may be called a Miltonic peculiarity) he would take no benefit from such private dispensation as a man might pass for his own relief in such a case, his neighbours winking at it so long as he did not disturb the forum.

    The Life of John Milton

  • There is certainly something of what afterwards came to be called Miltonic in more than one passage of

    Among My Books Second Series

  • It appears that Mr. Richard Wilbur was confusing "Miltonic" and "Petrarchan" in the title of his interesting sonnet [NYR, April 6].

    Is It Miltonic?

  • I risked calling my poem "Miltonic" because it employed the sonnet for a public subject (as in Milton's poems to Vane or Cromwell), because it used Milton's chosen Petrarchan scheme, and because its one sentence struck me as an unbroken thought.

    Is It Miltonic?

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