Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Water.
  • noun An aqueous solution.
  • noun A light bluish green to light greenish blue.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In pharmacy, a solution of an essential oil or gas in water, a solution of any other substance being termed liquor. In the British pharmacopœia, only a solution of an essential oil is called aqua, that of a gas being called liquor.
  • noun Water: a word much used in medical prescriptions written in Latin, and in pharmacy generally, also in old chemistry, to denote a solution, or menstruum of water.
  • noun In anatomy, some watery fluid or humor.
  • noun A carminative cordial prepared from oil of pimento (allspice): also called spiritus pimentœ. Dunglison.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed.
  • noun the aqueous solution of ammonia; liquid ammonia; often called aqua ammonia.
  • noun Same as Aquamarine.
  • noun (Chem.) a very corrosive fuming yellow liquid consisting of nitric and hydrochloric acids. It has the power of dissolving gold, the “royal” metal.
  • noun a fluid containing arsenic, and used for secret poisoning, made by an Italian woman named Tofana, in the middle of the 17th century, who is said to have poisoned more than 600 persons.
  • noun a name given to brandy and some other ardent spirits.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun inorganic chemistry The compound water.
  • noun A shade of colour, usually a mix of green and blue similar to the colour turquoise.
  • adjective Of a greenish-blue colour.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a shade of blue tinged with green

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Latin; see akw-ā- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin aqua, from Proto-Indo-European *akʷā-, whence also Old English ēa, ǽ ("river"). More at ea.

Examples

  • One volume of water will dissolve seven hundred times its bulk of this gas, and is then known as aqua ammonia, in contradistinction to anhydrous ammonia, the latter designating term meaning without water, while the term aqua is the Latin word for water.

    Scientific American Supplement No. 819, September 12, 1891

  • His experiments in distillation led to the discovery of what he termed aqua vitæ, or usually quinta essentia, and commended as a panacea for all disease.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Some hotels organize special events where children can do arts and crafts while parents can participate in aqua aerobics.

    Beyond spring break: Cancun has something for everyone

  • Some hotels organize special events where children can do arts and crafts while parents can participate in aqua aerobics.

    Beyond spring break: Cancun has something for everyone

  • Marks and Spencer have a nice double stipe shirt in aqua/grey, which would look good with a plain tie.

    What shirt to wear with an olive green suit? « We Don't Count Your Own Visits To Your Blog

  • As a product of the chemical laboratory, purple of Cassius, like Prussian blue, inspired interest and continued exploration. reference Yellow obtained from silver may have been one complementary technique; instructions that call for a solution of silver in aqua fortis, also precipitated in water, appear in a number of manuscripts and were published in several eighteenth-century chemical and general treatises. 10 reference

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • I'm a little worried about that kind of floods - I think locals call it "aqua alta"? did someone get married in Venice during winter ... how was the weather?

    Getting Married In Venice

  • Here were satins that gleamed like falling water; one, of the faint, moonlight tint that we call aqua-marine, another with a rosy glow like a reflected sunset.

    Three Margarets

  • We also need water to survive, let us not forget, and so vital is it that the Latin word aqua is an abbreviation of a phrase that’s something like what we need to draw from in order to live In 1999 on the islands of Japan Masaru Emoto published extraordinary research making the case that “water is a mirror reflecting our mind.”

    BREAKFAST WITH SOCRATES

  • We also need water to survive, let us not forget, and so vital is it that the Latin word aqua is an abbreviation of a phrase that’s something like what we need to draw from in order to live In 1999 on the islands of Japan Masaru Emoto published extraordinary research making the case that “water is a mirror reflecting our mind.”

    BREAKFAST WITH SOCRATES

Comments

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  • -ae F. water

    April 20, 2008