Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The lowermost part of an entablature in classical architecture that rests directly on top of a column. Also called epistyle.
  • n. The molding around a door or window.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The lowest part of an entablature; rests on the capitals of the columns
  • n. The mouldings (or other elements) framing a door, window or other rectangular opening

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The lower division of an entablature, or that part which rests immediately on the column, esp. in classical architecture. See column.
  • n. The group of moldings, or other architectural member, above and on both sides of a door or other opening, especially if square in form.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In architecture: The lower division of an entablature; that member which rests immediately on the column and supports those portions of the structure which are above it. See cut under entablature.
  • n. The ornamental molding running round the extrados of an arch. Also called archivolt.
  • n. Sometimes, less properly, the molded enrichments on the faces of the jambs and lintel of a door, window, or other opening. Also called antepagment.
  • n. In fortification, the master-beam, or chief supporter, in any part of a subterranean fortification.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the molding around a door or window
  • n. the lowest part of an entablature; rests immediately on the capitals of the columns

Etymologies

French, from Old French, from Old Italian : archi-, archi- + trave, beam (from Latin trabs, trab-; see treb- in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
First attested 1563, from Italian architrave, from archi- "main" + trave "beam." (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "Jack had introduced the electricity himself. He hadn't messed around. He ran the wires like streamers across the ceiling, tacked them on to wooden architraves, hung them from a picture rail and looped them around the curtain rods."
    —Peter Carey, Illywhacker, 34

    April 14, 2009