Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. Archaic Used in the imperative to express an order of dismissal: "Aroint thee, witch!” ( Shakespeare).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. to dispel, to drive away

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • interj. Stand off, or begone.
  • transitive v. To drive or scare off by some exclamation.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • An interjectional imperative, equivalent, in the passages quoted, to avaunt! begone! See etymology.
  • To say “aroint” to; bid begone.

Etymologies

Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Origin unknown. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Coleridge, and jam it down my throat; or I'll aroint myself.

    The Clarion

  • Co. -- inimitable Pickwick -- hail, all hail! but triumphs of burglary, and escapes of murderers, aroint ye!

    The Complete Prose Works of Martin Farquhar Tupper

  • For I would sooner face fifty deevils as my master’s ghaist, or even his wraith; wherefore, aroint ye, if ye were ten times my master, unless ye come in bodily shape, lith and limb.”

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • Collections I found it in a very old drawing, that he has published, in which St. Patrick is represented visiting hell, and putting the devils into great confusion by his presence, of whom one that is driving the damned before him with a prong, has a label issuing out of his mouth with these words, OUT OUT ARONGT, of which the last is evidently the same with _aroint_, and used in the same sense as in this passage.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • Well, if a witch can be arointed, why shouldn't she aroint other things? "

    The Clarion

  • For I would sooner face fifty deevils as my master's ghaist, or even his wraith; wherefore, aroint ye, if ye were ten times my master, unless ye come in bodily shape, lith and limb. "

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • ARONGT, "of which the last is evidently the same with _aroint_, and used in the same sense as in this passage.

    The Works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 05 Miscellaneous Pieces

Comments

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  • An incredibly hard word to find with a simple rack. Has an anagram: ration.

    August 11, 2013

  • JM is trying to remove stains by yelling 'aroint!'.

    January 18, 2011

  • "Mrs. Izard turned around. She faced Mrs. Zimmermann calmly. "So it's you," she said. "Well, my power has not reached its height, but I am still strong enough to deal with you. Aroint ye!"
    She pointed the ivory cane at Mrs. Zimmermann. Nothing happened. She stopped smiling and dropped her cane."
    The House with a Clock in Its Walls, by John Bellairs, p 152 of the Puffin Books paperback edition

    March 3, 2010