, itself, its own.' name='description'> auto- - definition and meaning

Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • A combining form, with the meaning of self, one's self, one's own, itself, its own.
  • a prefix with the meaning of self-moving, self-propelling; , an automobile car, carriage, truck, etc.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • prefix Regarding oneself
  • prefix automatic
  • prefix relating to cars or the driving of cars

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek αὐτo- (auto), from αὐτός ("self").

Examples

  • But the shareholding has weighed on Daimler earnings in recent years, including a €261 million hit to its 2010 profit, and the company officials have signaled the stake isn't core to its main auto- and truck-making activities.

    'Golden Share' an Option for EADS

  • We will read the biographies of famous people, do a report on a famous person of your choosing, and each of you will also write your own auto- biography.

    out of my mind

  • We will read the biographies of famous people, do a report on a famous person of your choosing, and each of you will also write your own auto- biography.

    out of my mind

  • We will read the biographies of famous people, do a report on a famous person of your choosing, and each of you will also write your own auto- biography.

    out of my mind

  • We will read the biographies of famous people, do a report on a famous person of your choosing, and each of you will also write your own auto- biography.

    out of my mind

  • These include prefixes, such as pre- or auto-, and suffixes, such as -ing, -tion, and -ism, that are meaningless on their own.

    A Mind at a Time

  • At home, parents can play word games in which children think up as many words as they can that, say, contain “auto-” and then talk about what all those words have in common.

    A Mind at a Time

  • These include prefixes, such as pre- or auto-, and suffixes, such as -ing, -tion, and -ism, that are meaningless on their own.

    A Mind at a Time

  • At home, parents can play word games in which children think up as many words as they can that, say, contain “auto-” and then talk about what all those words have in common.

    A Mind at a Time

  • In any case, there appears to be a significant interdependence: toleration of intense auto- and mutual-involvements seems to be functionally correlated with the practice and norm of disattending to many immediate stimuli.

    Behavior in Public Places

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