Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Being late or slow, especially in paying a debt.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In the rear; in a backward state; not sufficiently advanced; not equally advanced with some other person or thing: as, behindhand in studies or work.
  • Late; delayed beyond the proper time; behind the time set or expected.
  • In a state in which expenditure has gone beyond income; in a state in which means are not adequate to the supply of wants; in arrear: as, to be behindhand in one's circumstances; you are behindhand with your payments.
  • Underhand; secret; clandestine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adverb In arrears financially; in a state where expenditures have exceeded the receipt of funds.
  • adverb In a state of backwardness, in respect to what is seasonable or appropriate, or as to what should have been accomplished; not equally forward with some other person or thing; dilatory; backward; late; tardy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective late, tardy, overdue
  • adjective in debt, or in arrears
  • adverb belatedly, tardily
  • adverb in debt, or in arrears

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adverb in debt
  • adjective behind schedule

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These bare questions at once satisfied and silenced the greater number; some, however (like a few in England who are a century behindhand), thought that all such inquiries were useless and impious; and that it was quite sufficient that God had thus made the mountains.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • It was very necessary he should see Mr. Vanderlip, because of the shameless one he would be all of a week behindhand in filling the contract.

    Jack London Play:The Scorn of Women

  • I may be more than a bit behindhand with balancing bank statements, but the knitting archives are up-to-date.

    Archive 2009-09-01

  • It was very necessary he should see Mr. Vanderlip, because of the shameless one he would be all of a week behindhand in filling the contract.

    THE SCORN OF WOMEN

  • I may be more than a bit behindhand with balancing bank statements, but the knitting archives are up-to-date.

    Jean's Knitting

  • I have been behindhand with book buying 'cause of moving house, but I will very soon! be buying Magic Under Glass, Guardian of the Dead, and The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms.

    What authors can and can't do (more on whitewashed covers)

  • The month of October had put us a good deal behindhand, but now we were making up the distance we had lost.

    The South Pole~ From Madeira to the Barrier

  • These bare questions at once satisfied and silenced the greater number; some, however like a few in England who are a century behindhand, thought that all such inquiries were useless and impious; and that it was quite sufficient that God had thus made the mountains.

    A brief essay on the general attitude of common folks towards the natural world inspired by a passage in a book by Charles Darwin, Esq.

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    Your Election Central Guide To Blogs Covering The 2008 Presidential Election

  • I forget now where we were at noon on the second day, and where we ought to have been; but I know that we were scores of miles behindhand, and that our case was growing worse every hour.

    The Holly-Tree

Comments

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  • (adverb) - In arrears as to the discharge of one's liabilities; probably formed on the analogy of beforehand.

    --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

    January 17, 2018