Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as benzene, 1.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun organic chemistry An impure benzene, used in the arts as a solvent, and for various other purposes.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a colorless liquid hydrocarbon; highly inflammable; carcinogenic; the simplest of the aromatic compounds

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[benz(o)– + –ol.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

benzo- + -ol (“oil”)

Examples

  • Benzoline is not the same as benzene or benzol, which is one of the products of the dry distillation of coal.

    Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology

  • Commercially, benzene is often known as "benzol" or "benzole"; but it would be generally advantageous if those latter words were only used to mean imperfectly rectified benzene, _i. e._, mixtures of benzene with toluene, &c., such as are more explicitly understood by the terms "90. s benzol" and "50. s benzol."

    Acetylene, the Principles of Its Generation and Use

  • In NYC the Mont Blanc was loaded with (amongst other things) benzol, 544,000 kilograms of highly explosive picric acid, and 226,797 kilograms of TNT.

    The Week of Death - Day 4

  • Most of the synthetic fuels were produced by hydrogenation and Fischer-Tropsch, but also included alcohol, benzol, and the product of coal tar distillation.

    The Prize

  • Most of the synthetic fuels were produced by hydrogenation and Fischer-Tropsch, but also included alcohol, benzol, and the product of coal tar distillation.

    The Prize

  • II A ethane propane ammonia toluene acetone benzol

    8. Lighting Fittings

  • By the use of potassium chloride it was found possible to effect a separation with benzol and water, also with naphtha and water.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 497, July 11, 1885

  • This shows a great fall in value from highest to lowest, which seems to have been touched last year, except in the case of pitch and sulphate of ammonia, both of which have marked a considerable decline, even since last year, but it is pleasing to note that the others have shown at least some slight improvement -- crude naphtha and benzol having during the year risen nearly one hundred per cent. in value.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 601, July 9, 1887

  • Absorption of drugs often causes blindness -- tobacco, wood alcohol, lead, used in so many industries; bisulphide of carbon, used in making rubber; nitro-benzol, used in the manufacture of explosives, and some of the anilin dyes.

    Five Lectures on Blindness

  • It is easily soluble in alcohol, ether, benzol, chloroform, sulphide of carbon, and vinegar; to

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 447, July 26, 1884

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