from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of a group of Catholic martyrs who were supposed to carry their heads in their hands.
  • n. The family of mollusks with distinct heads.
  • n. The family of ventricose and filiform mushrooms.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cephalophoran.


From French céphalophore, from Ancient Greek Κηφᾶς (Kēphâs) + -phore, from Ancient Greek -φορος (-phoros, "bearing"), a derivative of φέρειν (phérein, "to bear, to carry") (Wiktionary)


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  • I <3 the -phore/-fer morpheme. It sticks out to me
    I made a comic about it:
    I made a list about it:

    So... I'll accept the award, but I don't know what to wear to the ceremony.

    May 1, 2016

  • I think TankHughes deseves some sort of word hoarder's trophy for knowing about this They Might Be Giants song.

    May 1, 2016

  • They Might Be Giants has a song about falling in love with a cephalophore.

    April 28, 2016

  • I think I should use this to refer to a motorcyclist carrying his/her helmet.

    April 28, 2016


    April 28, 2016

  • A cephalophore (from the Greek for "head-carrier") is a saint who is generally depicted carrying his or her own head; in art, this was usually meant to signify that the subject in question had been martyred by beheading. Handling the halo in this circumstance offers a unique challenge for the artist. Some put the halo where the head used to be; others have the saint carrying the halo along with the head.

    The term "cephalophore" was first used in a French article by Marcel Hébert, "Les martyrs céphalophores Euchaire, Elophe et Libaire", in Revue de l'Université de Bruxelles, v. 19 (1914).

    April 28, 2016

  • An iconographic term. The cephalophore in religious (esp. medieval Christian) art is a beheaded saint who displays his severed head to an audience.

    December 12, 2006