Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A grass such as wheat, oats, or corn, the starchy grains of which are used as food.
  • n. The grain of such a grass.
  • n. Any of several other plants or their edible seed or fruit, such as buckwheat or grain amaranth.
  • n. A food prepared from any of these plants, especially a breakfast food made from commercially processed grain.
  • adj. Consisting of or relating to grain or to a plant producing grain.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A type of grass (such as wheat, rice or oats) cultivated for its edible grains.
  • n. The grains of such a grass.
  • n. Breakfast cereal.
  • n. A particular type of breakfast cereal.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the grasses which are cultivated for their edible seeds (as wheat, maize, rice, etc.), or to their seeds or grain.
  • n. Any grass cultivated for its edible grain, or the grain itself; -- usually in the plural.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pertaining or relating to edible grain; producing farinaceous seeds suitable for food.
  • n. A gramineous plant cultivated for the use of its farinaceous seeds as food; any one of the annual grain-plants, as wheat, rye, barley, oats, rice, millet, or maize.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. grass whose starchy grains are used as food: wheat; rice; rye; oats; maize; buckwheat; millet
  • n. a breakfast food prepared from grain
  • adj. made of grain or relating to grain or the plants that produce it
  • n. foodstuff prepared from the starchy grains of cereal grasses

Etymologies

From Latin cereālis, of grain, from Cerēs, Ceres; see ker-2 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French céréale ("having to do with cereal"), from Latin Cerealis ("of or relating to Ceres"), from Ceres ("Roman goddess of agriculture"), from Proto-Indo-European *ker- (“grow”), from which also Latin sincerus (English sincere) and Latin crēscō ("grow") (English crescent). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Personally, I've never understood the appeal of marshmallows in cereal if the cereal is any good at all.

    Killer Cereal

  • This cereal is a wonderful example of an unglamorous food that nonetheless provides inexpensive and invaluable nutrition to millions of people in Asia and Africa.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • One quick and easy snack is homemade trail mix made with 1 to 2 tablespoons of dark chocolate chips, 2 tablespoons of dried fruit, half a cup of whole-grain cereal and 2 tablespoons of chopped nuts or sesame seeds.

    Kid-friendly diet helps fight childhood obesity at home

  • A small box of my fave cereal is 86mxn pesos at the Mescales WalMart, a scandal!

    ~~~> What Should I Bring?

  • We tried to give him a new multigrain cereal with water this morning and he seemed to like it ok.

    Reed at 5 months – sitting up, traveling, swimming, and always eating!

  • For the grains, I used white bread flour, whole wheat flour, and a multi-grain cereal (Bob's Red Mill High-Fibre Hot Cereal with Flaxseed) that I also wrote about here.

    Archive 2009-05-01

  • I can't speak for the US but Aussie homebrand cereal is usually akin to chewy cardboard.

    The Perfect Un-Foodie Schwag

  • When There are 500 different permutations of cereal, vs. 10 they get less of a deal because each individual type of cereal is bough in fewer numbers, and raising the price per unit.

    Evening Buzz: Health Care Battle on Capitol Hill

  • It turned out to be “Girls, Technology, and the Future”, and about a dozen people had a great discussion about our favorite books, and wanting Google to tell us which aisle the cereal is in at the store.

    Celebrating Ada Lovelace Day « Dyepot, Teapot

  • A Federal Trade Commission investigation that he helped launch attributed the sharp rise in cereal prices to “slotting fees,” the price manufacturers pay for prime placement on supermarket shelves; after an uproar in Congress, prices fell.

    The Man in the Middle

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.