Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A staff with a crook or cross at the end, carried by or before an abbot, bishop, or archbishop as a symbol of office.
  • n. Botany See fiddlehead.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A staff with a hooked end similar to a shepherd's crook, or with a cross at the end, carried by an abbot, bishop, or archbishop as a symbol of office.
  • n. : A young fern frond, before it has unrolled; fiddlehead

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The pastoral staff of a bishop (also of an archbishop, being the symbol of his office as a shepherd of the flock of God.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See crozier, croziered.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a staff surmounted by a crook or cross carried by bishops as a symbol of pastoral office

Etymologies

Middle English croser, from Old French crossier, staff bearer (influenced by croisier, one who bears a cross), from crosse, crosier, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Go, coin your crosier, melt your church plate down

    The Monastery

  • Only the bishops have retained the augurial staff, called the crosier; which was the distinctive mark of the dignity of augur; so that the symbol of falsehood has become the symbol of truth.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • That was called a crosier, Daoud recalled, and was the cardinal's staff of office.

    The Saracen: Land of the Infidel

  • "The hat and robe will cost four thousand taels, and the crosier, which is of the rarest materials and manufacture, will be sold for the same amount."

    Chinese Folk-Lore Tales

  • The crosier, which is another external ornament to the shield widely made use of by ecclesiastics, must not be confounded, as it often has been, with the processional cross of an archbishop.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 7: Gregory XII-Infallability

  • Modern art cannot, or does not, equal the chasing and carving of this splendid crosier, which is enriched with figures of saints and, apostles, and various Gothic devices, -- very minute, but all executed as faithfully as if the artist's salvation had depended upon every notch he made in the silver ... ..

    Passages from the English Notebooks, Complete

  • Modern art cannot, or does not, equal the chasing and carving of this splendid crosier, which is enriched with figures of saints and, apostles, and various Gothic devices, -- very minute, but all executed as faithfully as if the artist's salvation had depended upon every notch he made in the silver ....

    Passages from the English Notebooks, Volume 2.

  • • We do appear to have set the cat among the pigeons with recent revelations that Rowan Williams, the archbishop of Canterbury, barred Katharine Jefferts Schori, the presiding bishop of the US church, and the first woman to lead an Anglican province, from wearing her mitre or carrying her bishop's crosier during a sermon at Southwark Cathedral.

    Diary

  • Sinterklaas is dressed like the pope because he was historically a bishop in Myra Turkey, which explains for the mitre, dress, cape and crosier.

    Christmas in July: Going Dutch

  • He is generally represented as a bishop, a crosier in his right hand, holding a miniature church of chased gold on the open palm of his left hand.

    AS SEEN ON TV: SAINT ELIGIUS

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