Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An ornamental, often jeweled, crownlike semicircle worn on the head by women on formal occasions.
  • noun The triple crown historically worn by the pope, especially at his coronation ceremony, and still used heraldically as a symbol of the papacy.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An ornament or article of dress with which the ancient Persians covered the head: a kind of turban.
  • noun A cylindrical diadem pointed at the top, tipped with the mound and cross of sovereignty, and surrounded with three crowns, which the Pope wears as a symbol of his threefold sovereignty.
  • noun Figuratively, the papal dignity.
  • noun A coronet or frontal; an ornament for the head: used loosely for any such ornament considered unusually rich: as, a tiara of brilliants.
  • noun In heraldry, a bearing representing a tall cap-like or pointed dome surrounded by three crowns, one above the other, and having at the point an orb and cross: it is supposed to represent the crown of the Pope.
  • noun In conchology: A miter-shell.
  • noun [capitalized] A genus of miter-shells.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A form of headdress worn by the ancient Persians. According to Xenophon, the royal tiara was encircled with a diadem, and was high and erect, while those of the people were flexible, or had rims turned over.
  • noun The pope's triple crown. It was at first a round, high cap, but was afterward encompassed with a crown, subsequently with a second, and finally with a third. Fig.: The papal dignity.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The papal crown.
  • noun An ornamental coronet.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a jeweled headdress worn by women on formal occasions

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin tiāra, tall conical headress of the ancient Persians, from Greek tiārā.]

Examples

  • _mitra_, and [Greek: tiara], Lat. _tiara_, to designate two different kinds of covering for the head in use amongst the Oriental races, each one of a distinct and peculiar form, though as being foreigners, and consequently not possessing the technical accuracy of a native, they not unfrequently confound the two words, and apply them indiscriminately to both objects.

    Notes and Queries, Number 69, February 22, 1851 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • Mancuso, who once was given a tiara from a coach as a joke and has since worn them at her Olympic medal ceremonies, says the "most interesting" part of her past month was a "Larry King Live" appearance.

    Winter stars will get their groove on TV, tour, dance floor

  • An orange feathered boa that properly accents the funky new green crushed velour shirt and pink cowboy hat with a built-in tiara, now also sporting a feathery Mardi Gras mask.

    Archive 2008-01-01

  • My pink cowboy hat with a built-in tiara, now also sporting a feathery Mardi Gras mask.

    Archive 2008-01-01

  • My sense of humor, which I'm going to need to pull off an outfit made from a funky new green crushed velour shirt with a pink cowboy hat with a built-in tiara, now also sporting a feathery Mardi Gras mask and orange feathered boa.

    Archive 2008-01-01

  • This past week, she's begun to dress up in tiara and tutu and refer to herself in the third person as "the ballerina."

    Archive 2007-01-01

  • This past week, she's begun to dress up in tiara and tutu and refer to herself in the third person as "the ballerina."

    More Fluff: A Slice of Meme

  • Also rowena ravenclaw is a woman so that might point to a feminine object like a tiara, and the revenclaws are brainy people – again tiara – a crown for the head. .honouring the brain … right?

    A Potter Prediction

  • I guess his “corsage” is a lot bigger than yours… 3. The tiara is a prop for evil.

    Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II (1987)

  • The first proven appearance of the word tiara as the designation of the papal head-covering is in the life of Paschal II (1099-1118), in the "Liber

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 14: Simony-Tournon

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Another term used in heraldry.

    December 11, 2010