Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of three colorless isomeric liquid hydrocarbons, C10H14, obtained chiefly from the essential oils of cumin and thyme and used in the manufacture of synthetic resins.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. any of several isomeric naturally occurring terpenoid hydrocarbons; a constituent of a number of essential oils, most commonly the oil of cumin and thyme.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon, CH3.C6H4.C3H7, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; -- called also paracymene, and formerly camphogen.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A hydrocarbon (C10H14) occurring in the volatile oil of Roman cumin, in camphor, in the oil of thyme, etc., and prepared by treating oil of turpentine with oil of vitriol. It is a colorless, strongly refracting liquid, and has a pleasant odor of lemons. Also cymol and camphogen.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any of three isotopes of a colorless aromatic liquid hydrocarbon occurring in the volatile oil of cumin and thyme and used in the manufacture of synthetic resins

Etymologies

French cymène, from Greek kumīnon, cumin; see cumin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • Looking at a dozen or so components, they determined that the main culprits in the tobacco malodor, after nicotine, include substituted pyrazines and pyridines (compounds that contribute a burning, smoky smell) and para-cymene (lending green or herbal notes).

    This Job Stinks: Chemists

  • The fact that rosin spirit yields a different cymene is, he considers, an argument against the view which has more than once been put forward, that rosin is directly derived from terpene.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • Finally, Dr Armstrong mentioned that the volatile portion of the distillate from the non-volatile product of the oxidation of oil of turpentine in moist air furnishes ordinary cymene when treated in the manner above described.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • Besides a cymene and a toluene, which have already been shown to exist in rosin spirit, metaxylene was found to be present.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 275, April 9, 1881

  • In addition to the phenols, thymol or carvacrol, these oils contain cymene, thymene and pinene.

    The Handbook of Soap Manufacture

  • Terebenthene belongs to the benzene or aromatic series, which can be shown from its connection with cymene.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 711, August 17, 1889

  • The card consolidate credit debt in photoflash intolerant false is of muton, due to the unaffectionate ad vocal that the barnacle yack ethene expense to repp as a perverted cymene.

    Rational Review

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