Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A liquid terpenoid, C10H16, with a characteristic lemonlike fragrance, used as a solvent, wetting agent, and dispersing agent and in the manufacture of resins.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A general term applied to certain terpenes, C10H16.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun a liquid terpene with a lemon odor; found in lemons and oranges and other essential oils.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun organic chemistry A monoterpene hydrocarbon 1-methyl-4-prop-1-en-2-yl-cyclohexene found in the essential oils of oranges, lemons and similar fruit, and mainly responsible for their fragrance

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a liquid terpene with a lemon odor; found in lemons and oranges and other essential oils

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[French limonène, from limon, lemon (obsolete), from Old French; see lemon.]

Examples

  • In addition to copious amounts of vitamin C and antioxidants, citrus oils contain limonene, which is said to increase the level of glutathione S-transferase, one of the most important Phase II conjugators.

    The Source

  • In addition to copious amounts of vitamin C and antioxidants, citrus oils contain limonene, which is said to increase the level of glutathione S-transferase, one of the most important Phase II conjugators.

    The Source

  • This toxic reaction may be caused by a substance which is a chemical inhibitor to biogas bacteria called d-limonene, which is found in the peels of citrus fruits.

    Chapter 15

  • Insects hate limonene, which is the oil int he peel, and this is a great alternative to using commercial insecticides.

    BC Bloggers

  • Tetravalent terpenes, such as limonene, take four atoms of hydrogen whilst divalent terpenes (pinene, camphene) can fix only two, in accordance with the predictions made in the excellent work of Wallach.

    Paul Sabatier - Nobel Lecture

  • They can emit volatile organic compounds VOCs, such as petroleum distillates, that can irritate the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract, as well as d-limonene, a skin irritant.

    Everyday products in your home—use with care

  • Of these, limonene is commonly found in household cleaners; others include camphor and alpha-pinene.

    Trying to make scents of the chemicals in household cleaners

  • Of these, limonene is commonly found in household cleaners; others include camphor and alpha-pinene.

    Trying to make scents of the chemicals in household cleaners

  • High-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of limonene secondary organic aerosol, M.L. Walser, Y. Dessiaterik, J. Laskin, A. Laskin, and S.A. Nizkorodov, Phys.

    Contributor: Maggie L. Walser

  •  They can emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as petroleum distillates, that can irritate the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract, as well as d-limonene, a skin irritant.

    Everyday products in your home—use with care

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.