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Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adv. Downstairs; the opposite of upstairs.

Etymologies

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Examples

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Comments

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  • And double umbrage for not making a cellar list for our amusement.

    August 3, 2015

  • Umbrage! You didn't put brackets around jagron.

    August 3, 2015

  • Too much time reading Go Set A Whatchamacallit, you mob.

    August 3, 2015

  • Look, techncial foul is frankly the kind of hyper-advanced jagron that you newbies might not understand.

    August 3, 2015

  • Bilbybagginses, there is a typo in your comment about the technical foul--obviously disqualifying said comment. And a non-accent is, by its very nature, not an accent. (Once nebraksans conquer the airwaves, we'll use that platform to convince the rest of the world of this.) And furthermore, if the vending machine choses not to give you any tasty pellets, why not try putting some brackets around something in your own comments? (I find food pellet to be a yummy alternative.)

    August 3, 2015

  • How do you get a pellet of umbrage from this vending machine?

    August 3, 2015

  • Besides, isn't the 'null accent' an accent? It may be bland and want to hide in plain sight but it's still an accent.

    August 3, 2015

  • Hey, you can't take umbrage at a comment before I make it. I therefore take umbrage at your techncial foul.

    August 3, 2015


  • Don't forget the wine cellar, she shouted from Walla Walla.

    August 1, 2015

  • cellary with peanut butter

    August 1, 2015

  • Oh! And I take umbrage at the apparent lack of a cellar list--surely we'd like a nice spot for root cellar and storm cellar and that silly business about cellar door--right? I nominate bilbykins to make one for us. Just because.

    August 1, 2015

  • Gosh--it's been ages since we had a hilarious misunderstanding around here. Shall we commence with the phony umbrage taking? I'll start. First, as a nebraksan, I take umbrage at the notion that accents are somehow hip or cool. Why, around these parts, we pride ourselves on the notion that we make the most versatile newscasters because we have no accents. Ha! Second, I take umbrage at the notion that VM's humor is somehow impaired. Watch as I balance on this unicycle and toss fufluns toward the vendingmachine. Does it not spit quarters back at me? (Or those dreaded dollar coins that are impossible to feed into the coin slot on the city bus?) And last, but not least, I take umbrage at what I anticipate to be bilby's next comment--something along the lines of "take my wives... please." Sir, I take umbrage; not wives.

    August 1, 2015

  • VM seems to suffer from an impaired sense of humor. It may comfort him to insult some effigy of his prejudices to compensate but I do not appreciate being his target. This is a lexicographical site, not a therapy couch.

    August 1, 2015

  • I let most of my wives speak how they want, except when they vex me.

    August 1, 2015

  • What's wrong with your wife maintaining her own regional vocabulary? I've never understood the smug attitude of people from the East Coast. Sorry for the rant, but I've had personal experiences with people from the East Coast putting down other American regional accents and vocabulary, Believe it or not, people from other areas of the country are quite satisfied with where they live, the words they've grown up using, and don't need to adopt East Coast regionalisms or shake pesky articles. What vocabulary of hers have you adopted unmockingly?

    August 1, 2015

  • The definition for this expression is wrong. “Down cellar” does not mean “downstairs” it means “in the basement,” as affirmed by kraduate’s comment. It is a New England regionalism (note its inclusion in regional lists). I am a native New Englander but my wife is not. I have managed to move her from “in the basement” to “down in the cellar” to “down the cellar” but she cannot shake the pesky article. It sounds like it could be a survival from immigrants from Yorkshire. Unfortunately it is succumbing to the homogenization of American English.

    July 31, 2015

  • In the basement.

    October 16, 2008