Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or belonging to the superorder Endopterygota.
  • n. An insect of the superorder Endopterygota.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • All of these insects are, however, Coleoptera, and the adult insects of this order are much more disposed to walk and crawl and less disposed to fly than other endopterygote insects.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • In not a few endopterygote insects, the pupa shows more or less activity, swimming through water intermittently

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • We have already noticed (p. 40) how Sharp (1899) has laid stress on the essential difference between the exopterygote and endopterygote insects, the wing-rudiments of the former growing outwards throughout life while those of the latter remain hidden until the pupal instar.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • Among the endopterygote orders many Neuroptera and

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • In comparing the transformations of endopterygote insects of different orders, it is worthy of notice that in some cases all the members of an order have larvae remarkably constant in their main structural features, while in others there is great variety of larval form within the order.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • The foregoing brief outline of our knowledge of the geological succession of insects shows that the exopterygote preceded, in time, the endopterygote type of life-history.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • A similar though less extreme shortening of the imaginal life may be noticed in many endopterygote insects.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • The instars preceding this presumably had originally outward wing-rudiments in all insect life-histories, and the endopterygote condition was attained by the postponement of the outward appearance of these to successively later stages.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • A few examples from other orders of endopterygote insects will illustrate this point.

    The Life-Story of Insects

  • The pupa of the higher insects almost certainly corresponds with the may-fly's sub-imago, and the facts just recalled as to remnants of pupal activity suggest that in the ancestors of endopterygote insects what is now the pupal instar was represented by an active nymphal or sub-imaginal stage, possibly indeed by more than one stage, as Packard and other writers have stated that pupae of bees and wasps undergo two or three moults before the final exposure of the imago.

    The Life-Story of Insects

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