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Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A child nursed or brought up by one not its own mother or father.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a child who is raised by foster parents

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "Anna Regina Langfus was born in Lublin (Poland) to Moshe Szternfinkiel and his wife Maria (née Wajnberg), who also had a son, older than Anna" - Anna was a single child, the boy in question was a poor foster-child.

    Anna Langfus.

  • In federal audits since 2001 looking at abuse levels, parent turnover, placement, foster-child adoptions and other measures, no state has passed.

    USATODAY.com - Foster parents getting organized

  • Protestantism from the foster-child of Rome, the PROTEGEE of

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • The poem is very specifically concerned with the temporality of interpretation, in its effort to interpret an object that "speaks," albeit silently, from the past, as the "foster-child of silence and slow time," with a message for the future.

    Hermeneutics for Sophomores

  • To quote is to point elsewhere and otherwiseto a foster-child incapable of naming itself or its origin.

    Remembering to Die

  • South Side, where she lived in retirement with a little foster-child — a chestnut-haired girl taken from the Western

    Jennie Gerhardt

  • There were but three people left in the world that she could love: her foster-child, Frank Gresham — Mary Thorne, and the doctor.

    Doctor Thorne

  • From the description she gave of the beauty of her foster-child, as well as from the spirit of chivalry, Fitzosborne became interested in her fate.

    Waverley

  • For the first year and a half of his existence he had been the foster-child of the sturdy wife of a vine-dresser of Medoc — a lineal descendant of the heroes of ancient prowess; in a word, he was one of those individuals whom nature seems to have predestined for remarkable things, and around whose cradle have hovered the fairy godmothers of adventure and good luck.

    Off on a Comet

  • Mary was introduced to her as her future foster-child by the priests and by her parents.

    The Life of the Blessed Virgin Mary

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