Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Something consumed to produce energy, especially:
  • n. A material such as wood, coal, gas, or oil burned to produce heat or power.
  • n. Fissionable material used in a nuclear reactor.
  • n. Nutritive material metabolized by a living organism; food.
  • n. Something that maintains or stimulates an activity or emotion: "Money is the fuel of a volunteer organization” ( Natalie de Combray).
  • transitive v. To provide with fuel.
  • transitive v. To support or stimulate the activity or existence of: rhetoric that fueled the dissenters.
  • intransitive v. To take in fuel.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Substance consumed to provide energy through combustion, or through chemical or nuclear reaction.
  • n. Substance that provides nourishment for a living organism; food.
  • n. Something that stimulates, encourages or maintains an action.
  • v. to provide fuel
  • v. to exacerbate, to cause to grow or become greater

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any matter used to produce heat by burning; that which feeds fire; combustible matter used for fires, as wood, coal, peat, etc.
  • n. Anything that serves to feed or increase passion or excitement.
  • transitive v. To feed with fuel.
  • transitive v. To store or furnish with fuel or firing.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To feed or furnish with fuel or combustible matter.
  • n. Any matter which serves by combustion for the production of fire; combustible matter, as wood, coal, peat, oil, etc.
  • n. Figuratively, anything that serves to feed or increase something conceived as analogous to flame, as passion or emotional excitement.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. provide with fuel
  • n. a substance that can be consumed to produce energy
  • v. provide with a combustible substance that provides energy
  • v. stimulate
  • v. take in fuel, as of a ship

Etymologies

Middle English feuel, from Old French fouaille, feuaile, from Vulgar Latin *focālia, neuter pl. of *focālis, of the hearth or fireplace, from Latin focus, hearth, fireplace.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old French fouaille, from feu ("fire"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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