Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A large three-masted sailing ship with a square rig and usually two or more decks, used from the 15th to the 17th century especially by Spain as a merchant ship or warship.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A large unwieldy ship, usually having three or four decks and carrying guns, of a kind formerly used by the Spaniards, especially as treasure-ships, in their commerce with South America.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Naut.) A sailing vessel of the 15th and following centuries, often having three or four decks, and used for war or commerce. The term is often rather indiscriminately applied to any large sailing vessel.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun nautical A large, three masted, square rigged sailing ship with at least two decks.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a large square-rigged sailing ship with three or more masts; used by the Spanish for commerce and war from the 15th to 18th centuries

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Spanish galeon, from Old Spanish, augmentative of galea, galley, from Old French galie; see galley.]

Examples

  • Sebastien Carmenon piled up on the rocks with a silk-laden galleon from the Philippines.

    FOUR HORSES AND A SAILOR

  • In galleries, the galleon is installed against a painted map of the Tomales Bay excursion, early-modernified to look like an explorer's map, and showing the triangular route of the afternoon's trip, referring to the triangular routes of Manila galleons between San Francisco, the Philippines and Mexico.

    spam/maps

  • Drake, Sebastien Carmenon piled up on the rocks with a silk-laden galleon from the Philippines.

    Four Horses and a Sailor

  • Here, less than two decades after Drake, Sebastien Carmenon piled up on the rocks with a silk-laden galleon from the Philippines.

    Four Horses and a Sailor

  • At Tobermory, on the west of Scotland, a little handful of men have a strong faith that a sunken galleon from the Spanish Armada is the prison house of great treasure, and their faith is productive of an energy which makes zealous quest.

    Things That Matter Most: Devotional Papers

  • The modern connotation of "galleon" comes partly from the Armada, and partly from a later era, the 17th century, when a galleon was the Spanish equivalent of an Indiaman.

    Archaic terminology in historical fiction

  • The galleon was another type of large ship that Champlain knew well.

    Champlain's Dream

  • The galleon was another type of large ship that Champlain knew well.

    Champlain's Dream

  • The galleon was a long slender ship of extremely low freeboard, rakish rigged as a single-master, both sails and oars being used as

    The Stamps of Canada

  • The galleon was the _Mary of the Tower_, and she had a frightful list to starboard.

    Widdershins

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