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  • [Greek: kai archê de tou erôtos gignetai autê pasin, otan mê monon parontos chairôsin, alla kai apontos memnêmenoi erôsin.] [260] The line is a Fragment of Sophocles.

    Plutarch's Morals

  • +Transliteration: gignetai toinyn hôs egômai polis epeidê tunchanei hêmôn hekastos ouk autarkês.

    Plato and Platonism

  • When Plato said, "Nothing ever is, but is always becoming" ([Greek: aei gignetai]), he delivered a text, out of which we may derive something; for he destroys by it not all practical, but all speculative notions of cause and effect.

    Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

  • * panta de ta gignomena hupo te tinos gignetai, kai ek tinos, kai ti ... to de ex hou gignetai, hen legomen hulen ... to de huph 'hou, ton phusei ti onton ... eidos de lego to ti en einai hekaston, kai ten proten ousian: [2350] 1

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • * chronos d 'oun met' ouranou gegonen hina hama gennethentes hama kai luthosin, an pote lusis tis auton gignetai kai kata to paradeigma tes aionias phuseos hin, hos homoiotatos auto kata dunamin e:

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • * kraipnon toi sophie gignetai eutropies: [2224] 1

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • [1619] cf.Theog. 215: poulupou orgen ische poluplokou, hos poti petre te prosomilesei toios idein ephane Nun men tes ephepou, pote d'alloios chroa gignou, kraipnon toi sophie gignetai eutropies.

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • [1383] cf. Plato, Timaeus, S: 14, chronos d 'oun met' ouranou gegonen hina hama gennethentes hama kai luthosin, an pote lusis tis auton gignetai kai kata to paradeigma tes aionias phuseos hin, hos homoiotatos auto kata dunamin e Fialon (p. 311) quotes Cousin's translation at greater length, and refers also to Plotinus, Enn.II. vii.

    NPNF2-08. Basil: Letters and Select Works

  • Just here then is the original basis of society -- gignetai toinyn hôs egômai polis epeidê tunchanei hêmôn hekastos ouk autarkês + -- at first in its humblest form; simply because one can dig and another spin; yet already with anticipations of The Republic, of the City of the Perfect, as developed by Plato, as indeed also, beyond it, of some still more distant system "of the services of angels and men in a wonderful order"; for the somewhat visionary towers of Plato's Republic blend of course with those of the Civitas Dei of Augustine.

    Plato and Platonism

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