Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A once popular game of cards played by three people.
  • n. Three of the same cards held in one hand; three of everything.
  • n. A jest or scoff; trick or deception.
  • n. An enticing glance or look.
  • n. Good fortune; luck.
  • n. A stream of saliva from a person's mouth.
  • v. To jest, ridicule, or mock; to make sport of.
  • v. To discharge a long, thin stream of liquid, (including saliva) through the teeth or from under the tongue, sometimes by pressing the tongue against the salivary glands.
  • n. A geek who is involved in a glee club, choir, or singing.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A jest or scoff; a trick or deception.
  • n. An enticing look or glance.
  • n. A game at cards, once popular, played by three persons.
  • n. Three of the same cards held in the same hand; -- hence, three of anything.
  • intransitive v. To make sport; to gibe; to sneer; to spend time idly.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To ridicule; deride; scoff at.
  • To make sport; gibe; sneer.
  • To pass time sportively or frivolously; frolic.
  • In the game of gleek, to gain a decided advantage over.
  • n. A jest; a scoff; a trick or deception.
  • n. An enticing or wanton glance.
  • n. In music, same as glee
  • n. An old game at cards played by three persons, with forty-four cards, each person having twelve, and eight being left for the stock.
  • n. Three cards of a sort in this game, as three aces, three kings, etc. Hence— Three of anything.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French, from Old French glic ("a game of cards"), of Germanic origin, from or related to Middle High German glücke, gelücke ("luck"); or from or related to Middle Dutch gelīc ("like, alike"). More at luck, like.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Of North Germanic origin, ultimately from Old Norse *gleikr, leikr ("sport, play, game"), from Proto-Germanic *galaikaz (“jump, play”), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)lAig'- (“to jump, spring, play”). Cognate with Old English ġelācan ("to play a trick on, delude"), Scots glaik ("a glance of the eye, deception, trick", n.), Scots glaik ("to trick, trifle with", v.). More at lake.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Blend of glee and geek

Examples

Comments

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  • "'Have ye a deck of cards in the house?'

    'What? I—yes, of course.'

    'Bring them, then,' he said with a smile. 'Gleek, loo, or brag, your choice.'"

    —Diana Gabaldon, A Breath of Snow and Ashes (New York: Bantam Dell, 2005), 516

    February 1, 2010

  • I can't embed, so a link to the commercial will have to do.

    They're also having an online competition called "Biggest GLEEk."

    November 21, 2009

  • So Fox actually promotes this word, even though John's definition below is widely known? Maybe not the best marketing decision ever made...

    November 21, 2009

  • A fan of the show Glee, as dubbed by FOX.

    November 21, 2009

  • an enticing glance

    March 1, 2009

  • According to Wikipedia and Double-Tongued, it also means squirting saliva directly from the salivary glands.

    And it's the name of a blue space monkey sidekick from the old Super Friends.

    Used by Shakespeare, too, in Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream.

    November 8, 2008

  • 16th and 17th century game of cards for three players

    November 8, 2008

  • (obs.): gibe or jibe, flout, jeer, scoff, fleer, taunt, sneer, quip, fling, twit, wipe (dial. or slang), slap in the face.

    May 6, 2007