Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as haruspication. Also aruspicy. See haruspex.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun The art or practices of haruspices. See aruspicy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The study and divination by use of animal entrails, usually the victims of sacrifice.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin haruspicium

Examples

  • However I have a fresh entry just itching to be written about the Etruscan Piacenza Liver, a bronze model of a sheep's liver created for the ritualistic practice called haruspicy in order to divine the future.

    Itching to crack the Piacenza Liver soon

  • However I have a fresh entry just itching to be written about the Etruscan Piacenza Liver, a bronze model of a sheep's liver created for the ritualistic practice called haruspicy in order to divine the future.

    Archive 2008-12-01

  • It's well known that Etruscan haruspicy ie. divining the future from sheep's livers can only have derived from Anatolia where it was also practiced.

    More about egg symbols in Etruria and the rest of the classical world

  • It seems practically everything of Etruscans has already been shown historically to originate from the Near East despite any denials from a few narrow-minded historians: divine hammer/mallet/labrys, haruspicy, the alphabet, architecture, pottery styles, world-view, etc.

    More about egg symbols in Etruria and the rest of the classical world

  • Both mirrors suggest nothing more that vinum, mixed perhaps with some venena, was a great help in haruspicy.

    More about egg symbols in Etruria and the rest of the classical world

  • One link online concerning Babylonian haruspicy i.e. the practice of divining the future through sheep livers may oddly enough help us shed some light on Etruscan rites, beliefs and cosmology: Sacrificial divination: Confirmation of extispicy.

    Piacenza Liver and The Palace Gate

  • The Piacenza Liver is a bronze object designed to express the entire science of divination into a single model, uniting the practices of divination from lightning and bird omens (nb. the border representing the horizon and associated deities which is useful for these practices) with that of omens read from sheep livers (nb. the inner portion useful only to haruspicy).

    The identity of the Etruscan god Tecum

  • One link online concerning Babylonian haruspicy i.e. the practice of divining the future through sheep livers may oddly enough help us shed some light on Etruscan rites, beliefs and cosmology: Sacrificial divination: Confirmation of extispicy.

    Archive 2009-01-01

  • The Piacenza Liver is a bronze object designed to express the entire science of divination into a single model, uniting the practices of divination from lightning and bird omens (nb. the border representing the horizon and associated deities which is useful for these practices) with that of omens read from sheep livers (nb. the inner portion useful only to haruspicy).

    Archive 2009-07-01

  • As you say, Hercle is most definitely performing haruspicy because of his left foot raised to rest on what looks like nothing more than a stone, unbeknownst to mysterymonger De Grummond who mangles the meaning of the mirror with cutesy parenthesized question marks and disjointed artistic interpretations.

    More about egg symbols in Etruria and the rest of the classical world

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  • "When at twenty-three the dazzlingly beautiful wife of the king is appointed president of the Devel Academy, an assembly of venerable old men who have dedicated their lives to science, jokes are cracked on all the islands of the archipelago. But the jesters are in error—Uddo has an extensive knowledge of chemistry, transformation in metals, runes, augury, archaeology, metaphysics, geometry, architecture, statics, boat-building and building of labyrinths, demonology, astronomy and haruspicy."

    - The Golden Age by Michal Ajvaz, translated by Andrew Oakland, p 198 of the Dalkey Archive paperback

    June 14, 2011