Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A mixture of water and honey that becomes mead when fermented.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A liquor consisting of honey diluted in water; mead prior to fermentation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A liquor consisting of honey diluted in water, and after fermentation called mead.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A liquor consisting of honey diluted with water, fermented or unfermented: in the former case called vinous hydromel, and also mead.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. honey diluted in water; becomes mead when fermented

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English ydromel, from Old French, from Latin hydromeli, from Greek hudromeli : hudro-, hydro- + meli, honey; see melit- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin hydromel, hydromeli, from hydro- (from Ancient Greek ὕδωρ ("water")) + mel ("honey").

Examples

  • If you wish to ascertain if a woman be with child, give her hydromel to drink when she is going to sleep, and has not taken supper, and if she be seized with tormina in the belly, she is with child, but otherwise she is not pregnant.

    Aphorisms

  • But if he shall use ptisan for a draught, and drink afterward hydromel, he will feel full, flatulent, and uncomfortable in the viscera of the hypochondrium; but if the hydromel be taken before the draught, it will not have the same injurious effects as if taken after it, but will be rather beneficial.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • But unmixed hydromel, rather than the diluted, produces frothy evacuations, such as are unseasonably and intensely bilious, and too hot; but such an evacuation occasions other great mischiefs, for it neither extinguishes the heat in the hypochondria, but rouses it, induces inquietude, and jactitation of the limbs, and ulcerates the intestines and anus.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • And boiled hydromel has a much more elegant appearance than the unboiled, being clear, thin, white, and transparent, but I am unable to mention any good quality which it possesses that the other wants.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • But there are cases in which hydromel, strongly acid, does not promote expectoration, but renders it more viscid and thus does harm, and it is most apt to produce these bad effects in cases which are otherwise of a fatal character, when the patient is unable to cough or bring up the sputa.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • Pounding meconium, pouring on it water, and straining, and mixing flour, and baking into a cake, with the addition of boiled honey, give in affections of the anus and in dropsy; and after eating of it, let the patient drink of a sweet watery wine, and diluted hydromel prepared from wax: or collecting meconium, lay it up for medicinal purposes.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • And, with regard to the augmentation of the dose, if the disease be of a drier nature than one had supposed, one must not give more of it, but should give before the draught of ptisan, either hydromel or wine, in as great quantity as may be proper; and what is proper in each case will be afterward stated by us.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • But if taken intermediate between oxymel and hydromel, in small quantity, it promotes expectoration from the change which it occasions in the qualities of these drinks, for it produces, as it were, a certain overflow.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • By using hydromel without ptisans, instead of any other drink, you will generally succeed in the treatment of such diseases, and fall in few cases; but in what instances it is to be given, and in what it is not to be given, and wherefore it is not to be given, — all this has been explained already, for the most part.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

  • One must determine by such marks as these, when sweet, strong, and dark wine, hydromel, water and oxymel, should be given in acute diseases.

    On Regimen In Acute Diseases

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "Etienne swallowed the potion that had been placed in front of him, a potion very probably made of bidet water, the nectar of brothels and the hydromel of whorehouses."

    Witch Grass by Raymond Queneau, translated by Barbara Wright, p 298 of the NYRB paperback

    November 8, 2010