Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Space that has four or more dimensions.
  • noun A fictional space in which laws of physics may be circumvented allowing faster-than-light travel or time travel.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A space of more than three dimensions.
  • noun Non-Euclidean space.
  • Pertaining to either genus of hyperspace, n-dimensional or non-Euclidean.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Geom.) A mathematical space having more than three dimensions. It is a mathematical construct and is not intended to represent the structure of the common physical space in which matter exists.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun mathematics An n-dimensional Euclidian space with n > 3.
  • noun mathematics A Euclidian space of unspecified dimension.
  • noun science fiction A notional space orthogonal to the usual dimensions of space-time often used for faster-than-light travel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Not just a dogfight, but a dogfight in hyperspace!

    Question of the Day: What Are The Coolest SF Space Battles You've Seen?

  • I do not wish to enter the debate of slavery and states rights, there is note enough room in hyperspace for that one, I believe both sides foolishly thought it would be a brief conflict, that they were superior in both ability and God's blessing, and that was the greatest flaw, so brother killed brother, countless families destroyed, cities ruined. the North won, but we all lost, since we are still fighting this battle.

    The James Rifle

  • I do not wish to enter the debate of slavery and states rights, there is note enough room in hyperspace for that one, I believe both sides foolishly thought it would be a brief conflict, that they were superior in both ability and God's blessing, and that was the greatest flaw, so brother killed brother, countless families destroyed, cities ruined. the North won, but we all lost, since we are still fighting this battle.

    The James Rifle

  • But Marcus du Sautoy offers to name a symmetrical object in hyperspace for you.

    math

  • Hence, when I try to explain hyperspace or string theory to children, I use analogies that they can understand that summarize the essence of a physical theory.

    INTERVIEW: Dr. Michio Kaku

  • I had never been in hyperspace before, never actually been off the planet.

    365 tomorrows » 2007 » May : A New Free Flash Fiction SciFi Story Every Day

  • Are you also unaware that transponders are needed to identify and track ships in hyperspace? ” “Warp corridors?

    365 tomorrows » 2006 » September : A New Free Flash Fiction SciFi Story Every Day

  • Just wanted you to know that we're all reading your weblog whenever we get the chance (when we can catch a breath in hyperspace).

    It's Christmas On Hoth

  • 15: 10 Okay, WinAmp apparently wants me all floaty today ... now it's chucking out Ozric Tentacles. spirals in hyperspace!

    Tweets I have known

  • In return for a donation of at least £10, Marcus will name a hyperspace symmetry object after you (or someone else).

    Common Hope: naming symmetries for charity « dudegalea

Comments

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  • If we imagine a balloon as the space-time universe, traveling thru hyperspace is possible by pinching two points on the balloon together so as to make transit between them instantaneous. The problem would be how to generate enough energy to effect such a pinching. It would take A LOT of calories!!

    March 17, 2007

  • Funny reasoning. It sort of makes sense, until you get to the crux of the matter: All we have to do is pinch the universe, and we're golden!

    I think the issue is more than just generating energy... for example, how is one supposed to grab two points on the universe to bring them together, without simply moving matter around within the universe? We can move entire houses, but this has no effect on the "surface" of the universe, it all occurs in the realm of space. How can we reach beyond that realm, to affect the shape of the universe? I'm not sure that's possible. Not that it isn't a fun thought experiment.

    March 18, 2007

  • It's science fiction, pure and simple...

    March 19, 2007

  • Here's a citation from 1865

    http://goo.gl/x4yrJ Proceedings of the London Mathematical Society, Volumes 1-30

    I'm sure there are earlier citations of 'Hyperspace' from Mathematics.

    The Society, 1865

    "Papers presented to J. E. Littlewood on his 80th birthday" issued as 3d ser., v. 14 A, 1965.

    Hyperspace is on page 63 "Geometry and kinematics of Hyper-Space and of non-Euclidean space"

    January 28, 2013