Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. Also called saccharase, sucrase.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose (invert sugar); used by bees to produce honey.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An enzyme capable of effecting the inversion of cane suger, producing invert sugar. It is found in many plants and in the intestines of animals.
  • n. By extension, any enzyme which splits cane sugar, milk sugar, lactose, etc., into monosaccharides.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A ferment which inverts higher sugars to lower forms; specifically, a ferment which inverts cane-sugar to dextrose and levulose.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The bees use an enzyme called invertase to chop it up into the two smaller sugars, one of which, by the way, tastes sweeter than sucrose.

    NPR Topics: News

  • To do so, they must secrete an enzyme called invertase, which breaks sucrose into smaller sugars that the yeast can absorb.

    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • According to the researchers, the GIF1 gene is responsible for controlling the activity of the enzyme invertase, which is located in the rice plant's cell walls and converts sucrose to substances that are then used to create starch.

    SciDev.Net

  • "The GIF1 gene is responsible for controlling the activity of the enzyme invertase, which is located in the cell wall and converts sucrose to substances that then are used to create starch," said He.

    Lockergnome

  • The second counter, called a DNA invertase cascade, works in a similar manner, but is made from genes that code for a protein that both inactivates the original gene and primes the next for activation.

    ACM TechNews

  • The yeast process (Tompson's), which makes use of the inverting power of one of the enzymes (invertase) contained in ordinary yeast, is interesting.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 "Brescia" to "Bulgaria"

  • Mr. H.C. Brill [2] found raffinase, invertase, casease and protease in the pulp; oxidase, raffinase, casease and emulsinlike enzymes in the fresh bean; and all these six, together with diastase, in the fermented bean.

    Cocoa and Chocolate Their History from Plantation to Consumer

  • Soluble enzymes -- proteolytic, diastatic, invertase.

    The Elements of Bacteriological Technique A Laboratory Guide for Medical, Dental, and Technical Students. Second Edition Rewritten and Enlarged.

  • Crellin PK, Rood JI (1997) The resolvase/invertase domain of the site-specific recombinase TnpX is functional and recognizes a target sequence that resembles the junction of the circular form of the Clostridium perfringens transposon Tn4451.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Smith MCM (1998) In vitro site-specific integration of bacteriophage DNA catalyzed by a recombinase of the resolvase/invertase family.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

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