Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A small, usually secret group united for a common interest.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A private council or assembly; a combination of persons openly or secretly engaged for a common purpose, especially of a political character; a club of partizans or intriguers; a faction; a cabal; specifically, in English history, a group of leading Whig politicians in the reigns of William III. and Anne, of whom the most important were Somers, Wharton, Russell, and Montague.
  • noun Synonyms Faction, Camarilla, etc. See cabal

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A secret council to deliberate on affairs of government or politics; a number of men combined for party intrigue; a faction; a cabal

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Archaic form of junta.
  • noun A club, originally used thus by Benjamin Franklin

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a clique (often secret) that seeks power usually through intrigue

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration of junta.]

Examples

  • He was partial to a matchup zone he called junto, Spanish for “togetherness,” a term he picked up while teaching summer clinics in Puerto Rico.

    Pistol

  • He was partial to a matchup zone he called junto, Spanish for “togetherness,” a term he picked up while teaching summer clinics in Puerto Rico.

    Pistol

  • He was partial to a matchup zone he called junto, Spanish for “togetherness,” a term he picked up while teaching summer clinics in Puerto Rico.

    Pistol

  • he called junto: Phil Grose, “Clemson Destroys N.C. State, 67–46,” Charlotte Observer, March 2, 1962.

    Pistol

  • he called junto: Phil Grose, “Clemson Destroys N.C. State, 67–46,” Charlotte Observer, March 2, 1962.

    Pistol

  • he called junto: Phil Grose, “Clemson Destroys N.C. State, 67–46,” Charlotte Observer, March 2, 1962.

    Pistol

  • De Foe represented the Whiggism, not of the great 'junto' or aristocratic ring, but of the dissenters and tradesmen whose prejudices the junto had to turn to account.

    Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.)

  • These persons made up the committee of state, which was reproachfully after called the junto, and enviously then in the Court the Cabinet Council "(" History of the Rebellion, "vol. i., p. 211, edit.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 59: November 1667

  • These persons made up the committee of state, which was reproachfully after called the junto, and enviously then in the Court the Cabinet Council "(" History of the Rebellion, "vol. i., p. 211, edit.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1667 N.S.

  • These persons made up the committee of state, which was reproachfully after called the junto, and enviously then in the Court the Cabinet Council "(" History of the Rebellion, "vol. i., p. 211, edit.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

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