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Examples

  • A basic boot can take some 400 individual steps, from cutting back stays to sewing inlays and overlays, from stretching wet vamps over lasts to pounding in lemon-wood pegs to secure the soles.

    Most Expensive Cowboy Boots

  • He first got interested in archery when we lived in Florida and my mother gave him a lemon-wood longbow from a local sporting goods store.

    Summer of Deliverance

  • Where has she gone from the lemon-wood box I made for her, where she never slept at all, for she lay with me all night, not in the box, the lemon-wood box where she waited all day, watch-and-watch, Master, smiling when I laid her in so she might smile when I drew her out.

    The Shadow of the Torturer

  • The bookcases were of pale wood, lemon-wood or maple, and the walls were lined with books.

    Maigret and the Killer

  • At one side of her bed stood a big yellow chest-of-drawers of lemon-wood, and a table which served at once as pharmacy and as high altar, on which, beneath a statue of Our Lady and a bottle of

    Swann's Way

  • Alongside was a simple couscous, served from a lemon-wood couscous spoon that still smelled faintly citrusy.

    post-gazette.com - News

  • The Cynics enjoined poverty and a restriction of necessities; Socrates enjoined virtue as an old thing and a good one; the first Stoic one meets, even such a one as Seneca, who has five hundred tables of lemon-wood, praises moderation, enjoins truth, patience in adversity, endurance in misfortune, -- and all that is like stale, mouse-eaten grain; but people do not wish to eat it because it smells of age. "

    Quo Vadis: a narrative of the time of Nero

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  • "At one side of her bed stood a big yellow chest-of-drawers of lemon-wood, and a table which served at once as dispensary and high altar, on which, beneath a statue of the Virgin and a bottle of Vichy-Célestins, might be found her prayer-books and her medical prescriptions, everything that she needed for the performance, in bed, of her duties to soul and body, to keep the proper times for pepsin and for vespers."

    -- Swann's Way by Marcel Proust, translated by C.K. Scott Moncrieff and Terence Kilmartin, p 56 of the Vintage International paperback edition

    December 25, 2007