Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A female lion.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The female of the lion.
  • noun A woman who is an object of public interest and curiosity; rarely, a boldly conspicuous woman. See lion, 6.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Zoöl.) A female lion.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun a female lion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a female lion

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French lionnesse

Examples

  • Now a lioness is as good at stealth as she is at killing, but of course there would still be those bullets to contend with.

    A Principle

  • Getting ready, said Anne ONeil, whose hair brought to mind the word lioness.

    Roadside Crosses

  • Getting ready, said Anne ONeil, whose hair brought to mind the word lioness.

    Roadside Crosses

  • Getting ready, said Anne ONeil, whose hair brought to mind the word lioness.

    Roadside Crosses

  • Getting ready, said Anne ONeil, whose hair brought to mind the word lioness.

    Roadside Crosses

  • Getting ready, said Anne ONeil, whose hair brought to mind the word lioness.

    Roadside Crosses

  • The fact that a pregnant lioness is seperated from the pride prior to birth so that the male won't kill/eat her young has got to relieve "some" stress, ya think?

    Goodbye to Tatiana

  • One guy got a yin-yang on his ankle, one girl got a frackin 'lioness head on her shoulder blade (her.entire. shoulderblade.), and one guy got a Molson Canadian Maple Leaf on his shoulder.

    Piercing Insight

  • Saïd Business School , which is due to open in the autumn, and has indicated that he wants to name it after Baroness Thatcher, who he described as a "lioness".

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph

  • Erratic and vagrant instincts tormented me, and these I was obliged to control or rather suppress for fear of growing in any degree enthusiastic, and thus drawing attention to the 'lioness' -- the authoress.

    Life of Charlotte Bronte — Volume 2

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.