Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Chiefly Western U.S. See mountain lion.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A mountain lion; Puma concolor.
  • n. A woman of middle age who actively seeks the casual, often sexual, companionship of younger males, typically less than 35 years old; by implication a “sexual predator”.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An American feline quadruped (Felis concolor), resembling the African panther in size and habits. Its color is tawny, without spots; hence writers often called it the American lion. Called also puma, panther, mountain lion, and catamount. See puma.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A large concolorous feline carnivorous quadruped peculiar to America, Felis concolor, belonging to the family Felidæ and order Feræ.
  • n. Several species and subspecies of cougar have been recognized by naturalists, the Florida animal being known as Felis coryi and that from the northwest coast region as F. oregonensis. The southern form retains the name F. concolor: the type locality for this species is Brazil.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. large American feline resembling a lion

Etymologies

French couguar, alteration (influenced by jaguar, jaguar) of Portuguese çuçuarana, from Tupi suasuarana : suasú, deer + rana, like (from its color).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French cougar, from Brazilian Portuguese suçuarana, perhaps from Tupian (suasuarana ("deerlike animal"), from suasú ("deer"); compare sɨwasuarána ("cervine")) or perhaps form Guaraní (guaçuara). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • Older, single woman on the prowl.

    June 9, 2009

  • in current usage a cougar refers to an older woman who prefers the company of younger men.

    Bob found his inexperience with women was an advantage at the cougar bar.

    April 8, 2009

  • “The Grumman F9F/F-9 Cougar was an aircraft carrier-based fighter aircraft for the United States Navy. Based on the earlier Grumman F9F Panther, the Cougar replaced the Panther's straight wing with a more modern swept wing. The Navy considered the Cougar an updated version of the Panther, despite having a different official name, and thus Cougars started off from F9F-6 upwards.�? More on Wikipedia.

    December 30, 2008

  • Perhaps because I'm not drunk at the moment, I can't help re: drink and attire, but I agree that an element of predation is required to define an older woman as a cougar. I suppose the same effect could be produced by a really staggering degree of naivety in the younger man, rendering any woman a comparative predator. But a simple age difference of, say, 10 to 15 years is not sufficient by itself.

    November 27, 2007

  • Yes, I'm quite sure cougars are required to wear last year's business attire, and alternate between scotch and mimosa, depending on the day of the week.

    November 27, 2007

  • I think this is a subject of debate, and that the debates take place mostly in bars. But my understanding is that the coug, like her namesake, is a hunter. An age differential is necessary but not sufficient. I've also heard (drunk) Canadians discourse on finer points, such as attire, preferred drink, etc., but I'll leave those details to someone more in the know than I.

    November 27, 2007

  • So an older woman who likes younger men (and is in a reciprocating relationship) wouldn't qualify then?

    November 27, 2007

  • Clearly you have never met a cougar; it's part of the package. If you don't feel preyed upon, she's not a cougar. Or coug, as my Canadian friends more frequently put it.

    November 27, 2007

  • Preys? Is it nearly so diabolical?

    November 26, 2007

  • Also, an older woman who preys on younger men.

    November 26, 2007