Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To mix (clay and chalk) for making bricks.
  • noun Earth containing a considerable quantity of chalk in fine particles; a calcareous loam, constituting in the southeastern counties of England a soil especially suited for the growth of hops; a kind of earth suitable for making the best quality of brick without any addition.
  • noun [capitalized] The name used in Germany, and frequently by geologists writing in English on the geology of that country, for the uppermost of the three divisions of the Jurassic series, all of which at an early day received English provincial names, namely Lias, Dogger, and Malm.
  • noun plural Bricks made of malm earth, or of the artificial malm prepared by mixing clay with chalk.
  • Composed of malm or calcareous loam: as, malm lands.
  • Soft; mellow.
  • Peaceable; quiet.
  • To handle with sticky hands; “paw.”

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A kind of brick of a light brown or yellowish color, made of sand, clay, and chalk.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A soft, crumbly, chalky, grayish limestone.
  • noun An artificial mixture or chalk, clay, and sand, from which bricks are made. The resulting bricks have a light brown or yellowish color.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English malme (sand), from Old English mealm, mealmstān (sandstone); from or related to Old Norse malmr (ore, metal). From the same Proto-Indo-European root as meal.

Examples

  • London; but the available supply of this has been used up, and at the present time an artificial "malm" is prepared by mixing an ordinary brick-clay with ground chalk.

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 "Brescia" to "Bulgaria"

  • A very fine chalk-clay, or "malm" as it was locally called, was formerly obtained from the alluvium in the vicinity of

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 "Brescia" to "Bulgaria"

  • She whispered in my ear that she wanted me to malm her vlookenhibber right in her sweet tookemburri.

    Memories, From The Corner Of My Eyes

  • She whispered in my ear that she wanted me to malm her vlookenhibber right in her sweet tookemburri.

    Archive 2007-12-01

  • Several sorts of malm stocks, which are superior in color and texture, are made, and are used for facing bricks and for cutting; and what are called paviors, which are dark and strong bricks, are also made.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 601, July 9, 1887

  • All styrka är från jorden, ifrån Ymers kropp; de vilda vattnen äro ådrorna däri, och hennes senor äro smidda utav malm.

    Fritiofs Saga

  • To the north-west, north and east of the village, is a range of fair enclosures, consisting of what is called a white malm, a sort of rotten or rubble stone, which, when turned up to the frost and rain, moulders to pieces, and becomes manure to itself.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

  • These roads, running through the malm lands, are, by the traffic of ages, and the fretting of water, worn down through the first stratum of our freestone, and partly through the second; so that they look more like water-courses than roads; and are bedded with naked rag for furlongs together.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

  • To the south-west is a rank clay, that requires the labour of years to render it mellow; while the gardens to the north-east, and small enclosures behind, consist of a warm, forward, crumbling mould, called black malm, which seems highly saturated with vegetable and animal manure; and these may perhaps have been the original site of the town; while the woods and coverts might extend down to the opposite bank.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

  • I also like how you worked with the malm dressers.

    Apartment Therapy Main

Comments

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  • eOE tr. Orosius Hist. (BL Add.) IV. xiii. 113 Hit bith eac geornlic thæt mon heardlice gnide thone hnescestan mealmstan æfter thæm thæt he thence thone soelestan hwetstan on to geræceanne.

    April 26, 2008

  • Citation at quoinage.

    January 13, 2009

  • "7. To handle with sticky hands; “paw.”"

    --Century Dictionary

    March 30, 2011