Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A body part or process shaped like a handle, especially.
  • noun The broad upper division of the sternum with which the clavicle and first two ribs articulate.
  • noun The long tapering process of the malleus attached to the central portion of the eardrum.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In some technical uses, a handle or haft. Specifically
  • noun In anatomy and zoology: The presternum, or first piece of the sternum, of most mammals; the anterior, or in man the upper, segment of the sternum, corresponding to the first pair of ribs, and succeeded by a piece or pieces collectively called the gladiolus or mesosternum. See cut under sternum.
  • noun b) In birds, a small process, often forked, of the fore border of the sternum, in the middle line, at the root of the keel. See cut under epipleura.
  • noun The handle of the malleus; the process of the outer ear-bone, connected with the inner surface of the tympanic membrane. See cut under ossiculum.
  • noun In hydrozoans, the sac or polypite which projects from the center of the concavity of the nectocalyx of a medusa or the gonocalyx of a medusiform gonophore. See medusoid.
  • noun In botany, a cylindrical cell which arises from the center of the inner face of each of the eight shields that compose the wall of the antheridium in the Characeæ. Also called handle. Compare head, 6 , and head-cell.
  • noun In organ-building, a stop-knob or handle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Anat.) A handlelike process or part; esp., the anterior segment of the sternum, or presternum, and the handlelike process of the malleus.
  • noun (Zoöl.) The proboscis of a jellyfish; -- called also hypostoma. See Illust. of Hydromedusa.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun anatomy The broad, upper part of the sternum.
  • noun zoology The tube extending from the central underside of a jellyfish and ending in a mouth.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the upper part of the breastbone

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin, handle, from manus, hand; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin manūbrium ("handle").

Examples

  • The manubrium sterni moves 30 mm. in an upward and 14 mm. in a forward direction; the width of the subcostal angle, at a level of 30 mm. below the articulation between the body of the sternum and the xiphoid process, is increased by 26 mm.; the umbilicus is retracted and drawn upward for a distance of 13 mm.

    IV. Myology. 6c. The Muscles of the Thorax

  • It is also attached to the posterior surface of the sternum by the superior and inferior sternopericardiac ligaments; the upper passing to the manubrium, and the lower to the xiphoid process.

    V. Angiology. 4a. The Pericardium

  • It runs upward and forward in a canal, and enters the tympanic cavity, through an aperture (iter chordæ posterius) on its posterior wall, close to the medial surface of the posterior border of the tympanic membrane and on a level with the upper end of the manubrium of the malleus.

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • On the left side, beginning at the sternoclavicular articulation, it reaches the midpoint of the junction between the manubrium and body of the sternum and extends down the midsternal line in contact with that of the opposite side to the level of the fourth costal cartilage.

    XII. Surface Anatomy and Surface Markings. 6. Surface Markings of the Thorax

  • On the right side the line begins at the sternoclavicular articulation and runs downward and medialward to the midpoint of the junction between the manubrium and body of the sternum.

    XII. Surface Anatomy and Surface Markings. 6. Surface Markings of the Thorax

  • It traverses the tympanic cavity, between the fibrous and mucous layers of the tympanic membrane, crosses the manubrium of the malleus, and emerges from the cavity through a foramen situated at the inner end of the petrotympanic fissure, and named the iter chordæ anterius (canal of Huguier).

    IX. Neurology. 5g. The Facial Nerve

  • —The posterior sternoclavicular ligament is a similar band of fibers, covering the posterior surface of the articulation; it is attached above to the upper and back part of the sternal end of the clavicle, and, passing obliquely downward and medialward, is fixed below to the back of the upper part of the manubrium sterni.

    III. Syndesmology. 6. Articulations of the Upper Extremity. a. Sternoclavicular Articulation

  • The parts entering into its formation are the sternal end of the clavicle, the upper and lateral part of the manubrium sterni, and the cartilage of the first rib.

    III. Syndesmology. 6. Articulations of the Upper Extremity. a. Sternoclavicular Articulation

  • —The anterior sternoclavicular ligament is a broad band of fibers, covering the anterior surface of the articulation; it is attached above to the upper and front part of the sternal end of the clavicle, and, passing obliquely downward and medialward, is attached below to the front of the upper part of the manubrium sterni.

    III. Syndesmology. 6. Articulations of the Upper Extremity. a. Sternoclavicular Articulation

  • In order to mark out the anterior borders of the lungs a line is drawn from each apex point—2. 5 cm. above the clavicle and rather nearer the anterior than the posterior border of Sternocleidomastoideus—downward and medialward across the sternoclavicular articulation and manubrium sterni until it meets, or almost meets, its fellow of the other side at the midpoint of the junction between the manubrium and body of the sternum.

    XII. Surface Anatomy and Surface Markings. 6. Surface Markings of the Thorax

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