Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An obsolete spelling of mastic.
  • [Appar. an attrib. use of mastic with ref. to masticate.] Masticatory: only in the following passage, where modern editions and many manuscripts have mastiff.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But the seeds of all maladies are the same; and if turpentine, tar, pitch, and beef-suet, mingled with turmerick, gum-mastick, and one bead of garlick, can cure the horse that hath been grieved with a nail, I see not but what it may benefit the man that hath been pricked with a sword.

    Kenilworth

  • In that isle groweth mastick on small trees, and out of them cometh gum as it were of plum-trees or of cherry-trees.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • All, in a mastick hoar ensconced that grew thereby.

    Theocritus, translated into English Verse

  • One said he saw her under a mastick tree and the other under a holm tree.

    Some Winter Days in Iowa

  • As he followed the finely-sanded walks, he was startled by a new scent, and with dilating nostrils tried to catch it, tried to remember if it were mastick or some resinous fir; and, walking on like one in a trance, he admired

    Sister Teresa

  • Now there, "he went on, pointing with his stick," there I think grows my mastick or marum; perhaps I smell it, however.

    By What Authority?

  • The poor wretch, knowing no science, foolishly makes a wild shot instead of pleading a defective education, and says, "A verdant mastick, pride of all the grove."

    Old Scores and New Readings Discussions on Music & Certain Musicians

  • But the truth is, the picture has just been varnished with mastick varnish, which is apt to chill with the cold at this season of the year: and so I thought it best to keep it by me till its conveyance should be safer.

    Letters of Edward FitzGerald in two volumes, Vol. 1

  • Beyond the shore, strewed over with these rocks like tombs, ascended, in form of an amphitheater, among mastick-trees and cactus, a sort of small town, full of smoke, confused noises and terrified movements.

    The Vicomte de Bragelonne Or Ten Years Later being the completion of "The Three Musketeers" And "Twenty Years After"

  • But the seeds of all maladies are the same; and if turpentine, tar, pitch, and beef-suet, mingled with turmerick, gum-mastick, and one bead of garlick, can cure the horse that hath been grieved with a nail, I see not but what it may benefit the man that hath been pricked with a sword.

    Kenilworth

Comments

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  • "Maintaining an outward show of imperturbability, I took my portable pestle and mortar and began to grind up the ingredients; some mastick for sticking, a grain of sal ammoniack, two of frankincense, a dram of white vitriol and two grains of niter and verdigris both. Once these were pounded into a smooth paste, I then added the linseed oil, drop by drop, until the mixture had reached the right degree.

    'Where is the powder of worms?' I asked."

    —Iain Pears, An Instance of the Fingerpost (New York: Riverhead Books, 1998), 20

    October 6, 2008

  • Ooh, another good book! We must have similar reading lists.

    October 6, 2008

  • Curse my luck. How is it that I should see this on the exact day I finally went to the library and checked out the first of twenty Patrick O'Brian books?

    *mutters to self*

    January 26, 2011

  • Don't let those highbrow so-called "classics" interfere with your nightly romps with Rabelais.

    January 27, 2011

  • You're right, of course.

    *turns a bright shade of pink*

    January 27, 2011

  • I wouldn't call Pears highbrow, but the book is a good read, in my opinion.

    January 27, 2011

  • I was actually referring (facetiously) to O'Brian - who I do still plan on reading... if I ever manage to machete my way through the dense growth of my tbr pile.

    January 28, 2011