Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A dealer in a specific commodity. Often used in combination: an ironmonger.
  • n. A person promoting something undesirable or discreditable. Often used in combination: a scandalmonger; a warmonger.
  • transitive v. To peddle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A dealer in a specific commodity, normally used in combination
  • n. A person promoting something undesirable, always used in combination
  • v. To sell or peddle something

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A trader; a dealer; -- now used chiefly in composition.
  • n. A small merchant vessel.
  • transitive v. To deal in; to make merchandise of; to traffic in; -- used chiefly of discreditable traffic.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To traffic in; deal in; make merchandise of: chiefly used in composition with its object, and often implying a petty and discreditable traffic.
  • n. A trader; a dealer: now used only or chiefly in composition: as, fishmonger, ironmonger. It is often used allusively, implying a petty or discreditable traffic or activity, as in scandal-monger, mutton-monger, whoremonger.
  • n. A small kind of trading-vessel.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. sell or offer for sale from place to place
  • n. someone who purchases and maintains an inventory of goods to be sold

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English mongere, from Old English mangere, from Latin mangō, dealer in slaves, probably of Greek origin.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English mangere, from Proto-Germanic *mangojan, from Latin mango "dealer, trader".

Examples

Comments

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  • Spotted a cheese monger's shop in Glasgow the other day!

    August 18, 2007