Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A form of breech-loading rifle in which the cartridge is exploded by the rapid impact at its base of a needle or small spike.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The carnage that repelled the Chancellor was due in part to the French infantry rifle, the chassepot, which proved to be a more effective instrument of destruction than the Prussian needle-gun.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • The carnage that repelled the Chancellor was due in part to the French infantry rifle, the chassepot, which proved to be a more effective instrument of destruction than the Prussian needle-gun.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • The carnage that repelled the Chancellor was due in part to the French infantry rifle, the chassepot, which proved to be a more effective instrument of destruction than the Prussian needle-gun.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • The carnage that repelled the Chancellor was due in part to the French infantry rifle, the chassepot, which proved to be a more effective instrument of destruction than the Prussian needle-gun.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • The carnage that repelled the Chancellor was due in part to the French infantry rifle, the chassepot, which proved to be a more effective instrument of destruction than the Prussian needle-gun.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • "Easy," Niven said, gesturing with the needle-gun.

    Starfishers

  • Earlier, he had seen the shape of the needle-gun lumping her underwear in a dresser drawer.

    Starfishers

  • But what struck him most was a recent Prussian invention, the needle-gun, which he saw would be the arm of the future.

    John Nicholson The Lion of the Punjaub

  • Nicholas von Dreyse, inventor of the needle-gun, is now living, at the age of seventy-eight.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 109, November, 1866

  • [46] There has been as much noise made over the needle-gun as by that famous and fascinating slaughter weapon; yet it is by no means an arm of tender years.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 109, November, 1866

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "What struck him most was a recent Prussian invention, the needle-gun, which he saw would be the arm of the future."

    --"John Nicholson, The Lion of the Punjaub" Author: R. E. Cholmeley, 1908.
    "My Lord, you may rely upon this, that if ever
    there is a desperate deed to be done in India,
    John Nicholson is the man to do it."
    Sir Herbert Edwardes to Lord Canning,
    March 1857.

    July 28, 2015