Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A schoolteacher; an educator.
  • noun One who instructs in a pedantic or dogmatic manner.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A teacher of children; one whose occupation is the instruction of children; a schoolmaster: now used, generally with a sense of contempt, for a dogmatic and narrow-minded teacher.
  • noun A schoolroom, or an apartment set apart as a schoolroom.
  • To teach; especially, to teach with the air of a pedagogue.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Gr. Antiq.) A slave who led his master's children to school, and had the charge of them generally.
  • noun A teacher of children; one whose occupation is to teach the young; a schoolmaster.
  • noun One who by teaching has become formal, positive, or pedantic in his ways; one who has the manner of a schoolmaster; a pedant.
  • transitive verb obsolete To play the pedagogue toward.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A teacher or instructor of children; one whose occupation is to teach the young.
  • noun A pedant; one who by teaching has become overly formal or pedantic in his or her ways; one who has the manner of a teacher.
  • noun archaic A slave who led the master's children to school, and had the charge of them generally.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun someone who educates young people

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English pedagoge, from Old French, from Latin paedagōgus, slave who supervised children and took them to and from school, from Greek paidagōgos : paido-, boy; see pedo– + agōgos, leader (from agein, to lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French pedagogue, from Latin paedagogus, from Ancient Greek παιδαγωγέω (paidagōgeō), παιδαγωγός (paidagogos), from παιδός (paidos, "child") (genitive of παῖς (pais)) + ἀγωγός (agogos, "guide"), άγω (ágō, "lead").

Examples

Comments

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  • -- Getououthat, you bloody old pedagogue! the editor said in recognition.

    Joyce, Ulysses, 7

    January 2, 2007

  • He's a windbag and a pedagogue!

    January 8, 2011