Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of, relating to, or useful in prognosis.
  • adjective Of or relating to prediction; predictive.
  • noun A sign or symptom indicating the future course of a disease.
  • noun A sign of a future happening; a portent.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To prognosticate.
  • Foreshowing; indicating something in the future by signs or symptoms: as, the prognostic indications of a disease.
  • noun That which prognosticates or foretells; a sign by which a future event may be known or foreshown; an omen; a token.
  • noun A prediction; a foretelling.
  • noun Synonyms Sign, Presage, etc. See omen, and foretell, v. i.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun That which prognosticates; a sign by which a future event may be known or foretold; an indication; a sign or omen; hence, a foretelling; a prediction.
  • noun (Med.) A sign or symptom indicating the course and termination of a disease.
  • adjective Indicating something future by signs or symptoms; foreshowing; aiding in prognosis
  • transitive verb obsolete To prognosticate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of, pertaining to or characterized by prognosis or prediction.
  • noun rare, medicine prognosis
  • noun A sign by which a future event may be known or foretold.
  • noun A prediction of the future.
  • noun One who predicts the future.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a sign of something about to happen
  • adjective of or relating to prediction; having value for making predictions

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English pronostik, prognosticating, omen, from Medieval Latin prognōsticus, prognosticating, from Greek prognōstikos, from prognōsis, foreknowledge; see prognosis. N., from Latin prognōsticum, omen, from Greek prognōstikon, from neuter of prognōstikos.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Medieval Latin prognosticus, from Ancient Greek προγνωστικός (prognostikos, "foreknowing"), from πρό- (pro-) + γνωστικός (gnostikos, "of or for knowing, good at knowing"), from γιγνώσκω (gignosko, "to learn to know, to perceive, to mark, to learn"). Compare French pronostic ("prognostic").

Examples

  • However, one thing is certain, researchers say: Fatigue has been shown to have independent long-term prognostic implications in patients with heart failure, suggesting that fatigue needs to be effectively evaluated not only because symptom alleviation is a target for treatment, but also because of the potential for the treatment of fatigue to influence the prognosis in patients with heart failure.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Ray KK, Morrow DA, Sabatine MS, Shui A, Rifai N, et al. (2007) Long-term prognostic value of neopterin: a novel marker of monocyte activation in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PLoS Medicine: New Articles

  • However, one thing is certain, researchers say: Fatigue has been shown to have independent long-term prognostic implications in patients with heart failure, suggesting that fatigue needs to be effectively evaluated not only because symptom alleviation is a target for treatment, but also because of the potential for the treatment of fatigue to influence the prognosis in patients with heart failure.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Consequently a sacrament is a sign that is both a reminder of the past, i.e. the passion of Christ; and an indication of that which is effected in us by Christ's passion, i.e. grace; and a prognostic, that is, a foretelling of future glory.

    Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) From the Complete American Edition

  • And after struggling for several years with determining their own patients' prognoses, a group of physicians at the University of California in San Francisco set out to collect and study all the research that had been done on so-called prognostic indexes, tools that help with determining general prognosis in older patients.

    NYT > Home Page

  • He finds it hard to forget that until recently all manner of climatic conditions were associated with phases of the moon; that not so very long ago showers of falling-stars were considered "prognostic" of certain kinds of weather; and that the "equinoctial storm" had been accepted as a verity by every one, until the unfeeling hand of statistics banished it from the earth.

    A History of Science: in Five Volumes. Volume III: Modern development of the physical sciences

  • In the height of this charming exercise, it entered my mind to make a kind of prognostic, that might calm my inquietude; I said, "I will throw this stone at the tree facing me; if I hit my mark, I will consider it as a sign of salvation; if I miss, as a token of damnation."

    The Confessions of J J Rousseau

  • In the height of this charming exercise, it entered my mind to make a kind of prognostic, that might calm my inquietude; I said, "I will throw this stone at the tree facing me; if I hit my mark, I will consider it as a sign of salvation; if I miss, as a token of damnation."

    The Confessions of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  • In the height of this charming exercise, it entered my mind to make a kind of prognostic, that might calm my inquietude; I said, "I will throw this stone at the tree facing me; if I hit my mark, I will consider it as a sign of salvation; if I miss, as a token of damnation."

    The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau — Volume 06

  • In the height of this charming exercise, it entered my mind to make a kind of prognostic, that might calm my inquietude; I said, "I will throw this stone at the tree facing me; if I hit my mark, I will consider it as a sign of salvation; if I miss, as a token of damnation."

    The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau — Complete

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