Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See habit, 5.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now and again he caught glimpses, framed in green foliage, of the golden brown of Lute's corduroy riding-habit and of the bay horse that moved beneath her.

    Jack London's Story - Moon Face: Planchette pg 3 of 3

  • The ceremony was over, and he had left Dede to go inside and change into her riding-habit while he brought the horses.

    Chapter XXIV

  • At the same moment the door opened, and a lady dressed in a riding-habit, and wearing a black veil over her hat, appeared at the entry of the apartment.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • “I come — I come, greymalkin,” answered Clara, in the same vein as before, and entered the parlour as she spoke, her finery entirely thrown aside, and dressed in the riding-habit which was her usual and favourite attire.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Hartley looked in the same direction with the two who were speaking, and his eye was caught by a Semiramis-looking person, of unusual stature and amplitude, arrayed in a sort of riding-habit, but so formed, and so looped and gallooned with lace, as made it resemble the upper tunic of a native chief.

    The Surgeon's Daughter

  • Mowbray, as he placed his sister in her chair, made her general apology for her late appearance, and her riding-habit.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • Amid this scene of confusion, a gentleman, plainly dressed in a riding-habit, with a black cockade in his hat, but without any arms except

    Redgauntlet

  • Grand Alliance Circus out, in procession; buxom lady-member of Grand Alliance, in crimson riding-habit, fresher to look at, even in her paint under the day sky, than the cheeks of Lunatics or Keepers.

    The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices

  • Her tartan screen served all the purposes of a riding-habit and of an umbrella; a small bundle contained such changes of linen as were absolutely necessary.

    The Heart of Mid-Lothian

  • My riding-habit was left at Toronto, but this seemed not to be a difficulty.

    The Englishwoman in America

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "5. A costume worn by women when riding on horseback; a riding-habit. This, until a recent date (perhaps 1870), had a very long full skirt of cloth which it was customary to pin or otherwise fasten below the feet of the wearer when mounted. The habit used at present is much shorter, and close-fitting. The edge or hem of the skirt is sometimes loaded."

    --from the Century Dictionary definition for habit

    January 5, 2011