Definitions

from The American HeritageĀ® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An acute, often fatal, contagious viral disease, chiefly of cattle, characterized by ulceration of the alimentary tract and resulting in diarrhea.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a contagious disease of ruminants and swine caused by an RNA virus of the genus Morbillivirus.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A highly contagious distemper or murrain, affecting neat cattle, and less commonly sheep and goats; -- called also cattle plague, Russian cattle plague, and steppe murrain.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An acute infectious disease of cattle, appearing occasionally among sheep, and communicable to other ruminants.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an acute infectious viral disease of cattle (usually fatal); characterized by fever and diarrhea and inflammation of mucous membranes

Etymologies

German : Rinder, genitive pl. of Rind, head of cattle, ox (from Middle High German rint, from Old High German hrind; see ker-1 in Indo-European roots) + Pest, plague (from Latin pestis).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From German RinderpestĀ ("cattle plague"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Really? Now who will pester the rinders?

    November 16, 2010

  • Now declared eradicated, according to this article in the NY Times.

    November 9, 2010

  • Walter Plowright, 86, the British veterinarian who discovered a vaccine that has almost totally eliminated the cattle disease rinderpest, died Feb. 19 (2010) in London. {Washington Post, March 23, 2010)

    March 28, 2010

  • Usage on bongo.

    September 22, 2008

  • Science 21 March 2008:
    Vol. 319. no. 5870, pp. 1606 - 1609
    DOI: 10.1126/science.319.5870.1606

    March 21, 2008