Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A coarse, stout woven cloth, such as burlap or gunny, used for making sacks; sackcloth.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A coarse fabric of hemp or flax, of which sacks, bags, etc., are made: also used for other purposes where strength and durability are required. Compare sacking-bottomed.
  • noun The act of plundering or pillaging, after storming and taking, as a house or a city.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Stout, coarse cloth of which sacks, bags, etc., are made.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun uncountable Cheap rough cloth such as would be used to make bags (sacks).
  • noun countable Firing or termination of an employee.
  • verb Present participle of sack.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the termination of someone's employment (leaving them free to depart)
  • noun coarse fabric used for bags or sacks

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The tongues of the bells he wrapped in sacking tied with grasses.

    BURIAL OF THE BELLS • by Sarah Hilary

  • He was wearing a very smooth line in Italian sacking and all that soot wouldn't be doing it any good at all but he didn't seem to care.

    The Satan Bug

  • "Durrani was working an American agenda, and his sacking was a step in right direction," said Gen. Aslam Beg, a former chief of army staff.

    Pakistani Firing Exposes

  • Aside from how deeply I dislike the idea of sacking someone for talking about the creative process comics are apparently like sausages and laws: if you like the finished product, you should never find out how they're made, it's of interest to me, of course, because McDuffie directly namechecks Black Canary.

    Dwayne McDuffie fired from JLA

  • But with the outrage yielding some of the most violent attacks the Middle East has seen lately (outside of Iraq, that is) - namely the sacking of the Danish consulate in Beirut and of the Danish and Norwegian embassies in Damascus - the protesters have gotten what they clearly are after: a closer look from the Western media.

    Suzanne Nossel: Muslim Cartoons and the Terror at Home

  • Mr. Harkness used a method of breaking horses called sacking out.

    Plain Language

  • Mr. Harkness used a method of breaking horses called sacking out.

    Plain Language

  • The White House has said the idea of sacking federal prosecutors came from Harriet Miers, who replaced Gonzales as White House counsel after his cabinet promotion.

    CNN Transcript Mar 15, 2007

  • Mr. Harkness used a method of breaking horses called sacking out.

    Plain Language

  • Mr. Harkness used a method of breaking horses called sacking out.

    Plain Language

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