Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of, relating to, or used in a sacrament.
  • adjective Consecrated or bound by or as if by a sacrament.
  • adjective Having the force or efficacy of a sacrament.
  • noun A rite, act, or sacred object used by some Christian churches in worship.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of, pertaining to, or constituting a sacrament; of the nature of a sacrament; used in the sacrament: as, sacramental rites or elements; sacramental union.
  • Bound or consecrated by a sacrament or oath.
  • In ancient Roman law, of or pertaining to the pledges deposited by the parties to a cause before entering upon litigation.
  • noun A rite analogous to but not included among the recognized sacraments.
  • noun plural Certain instruments or materials used in a sacrament, or ceremonies connected with a sacrament.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to a sacrament or the sacraments; of the nature of a sacrament; sacredly or solemnly binding.
  • adjective Bound by a sacrament.
  • noun That which relates to a sacrament.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Used in, or relating to, a sacrament.
  • noun Christianity An object (such as holy water or a crucifix) or an action (such as making the sign of the cross) which is regarded as encouraging devotion and thus spiritually aiding the person who uses it.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective of or relating to or involving a sacrament

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • So we're really leaving that what we refer to as sacramental marks of their presence with us, that is to say the sort of outward and visible sign that they were here and that we ministered to them here for so long.

    CNN Transcript Sep 11, 2002

  • Mgr. Sokolowski concludes this section of his book with this final point of clarification: it might appear that the primary initiative in sacramental action lies in the present moment, with the Church and the local community and the celebrant of the Mass; […].

    "The Liturgy Changes Us..."

  • Behind various interpretations of this distinction lurks a large issue in sacramental and liturgical theology: what efficacious role to these ‘non-divine’ liturgical elements have?

    Dr. Alcuin Reid at the Toronto Oratory

  • According to Ina May, it began to gain sacramental status shortly before the departure of the Caravan.

    Manhood in the Age of Aquarius: Masculinity in Two Countercultural Communities, 1965–83

  • Whitman, as poet of the body and of the soul, figures the relationship between self and other in sacramental and physical terms.

    'Points of Contact': Blake and Whitman

  • -- It requires only the sincere belief by the person seeking marriage in the Church that the original marriage was not "sacramental" -- this does not even require the official

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  • Occasionally, a dinner guest will spoil our little celebration of American supremacy by calling our sacramental potatoes, "french fries."

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  • Occasionally, a dinner guest will spoil our little celebration of American supremacy by calling our sacramental potatoes, "french fries."

    Purging Justice

  • Occasionally, a dinner guest will spoil our little celebration of American supremacy by calling our sacramental potatoes, "french fries."

    03/06/2005 - 03/13/2005

  • Besides sanctifying grace the Sacraments give another grace, called sacramental grace.

    Baltimore Catechism No. 3 (of 4)

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