Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Any of several salt-tolerant plants of the genus Atriplex, having edible leaves and important as browse plants.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Any one of several species of plants, chiefly of the genus Atriplex, covering extensive plains in the interior of Australia.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) An Australian plant (Atriplex nummularia) of the Goosefoot family.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Any of the genus Atriplex of plants, including many desert and seashore plants and halophytes.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun any of various shrubby plants of the genus Atriplex that thrive in dry alkaline soil

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

salt +‎ bush

Examples

  • By the time we bought the property in 2003 most of the native grasses were gone, only a few winged saltbush shrubs existed.

    Bird Cloud

  • By the time we bought the property in 2003 most of the native grasses were gone, only a few winged saltbush shrubs existed.

    Bird Cloud

  • Sheep fattened on the nutritious saltbush and found enough water.

    Bird Cloud

  • Sheep fattened on the nutritious saltbush and found enough water.

    Bird Cloud

  • By the time we bought the property in 2003 most of the native grasses were gone, only a few winged saltbush shrubs existed.

    Bird Cloud

  • We planted trees, willows, encouraged the saltbush which suddenly began to appear.

    Bird Cloud

  • We planted trees, willows, encouraged the saltbush which suddenly began to appear.

    Bird Cloud

  • By the time we bought the property in 2003 most of the native grasses were gone, only a few winged saltbush shrubs existed.

    Bird Cloud

  • Sheep fattened on the nutritious saltbush and found enough water.

    Bird Cloud

  • We planted trees, willows, encouraged the saltbush which suddenly began to appear.

    Bird Cloud

Comments

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  • "Dr Gavin Prideaux says the prehistoric animals ate saltbush, which could have survived in extreme heat. 'One thing about saltbush is it's salty, so because they had to drink more, they were drawn to water holes,' he said. 'What we argue is that because people were also living around water holes ... it would have made Procoptodon goliah susceptible to hunting.'"

    - Dying for a drink: New theory on giant roo extinction, abc.net.au, 23 June 2009j.

    June 23, 2009