Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Greek Mythology A woodland creature depicted as having the pointed ears, legs, and short horns of a goat and a fondness for unrestrained revelry.
  • noun A licentious man; a lecher.
  • noun A man who is affected by satyriasis.
  • noun Any of various satyrid butterflies having brownish wings marked with eyespots.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In classical mythology, a sylvan deity, representing the luxuriant forces of Nature, and closely connected with the worship of Bacchus.
  • noun A very lecherous or lascivious person; one affected with satyriasis.
  • noun In zoology: The orang-utan, Simia satyrus: see Satyrus.
  • noun A pheasant of the genus Ceriornis; a tragopan.
  • noun An argus-butterfly: same as meadow-brown; any member of the Satyrinæ.
  • noun In heraldry, same as manticore.
  • noun An obsolete erroneous spelling of satire.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Class. Myth.) A sylvan deity or demigod, represented as part man and part goat, and characterized by riotous merriment and lasciviousness.
  • noun (Zoöl.) Any one of many species of butterflies belonging to the family Nymphalidæ. Their colors are commonly brown and gray, often with ocelli on the wings. Called also meadow browns.
  • noun (Zoöl.) The orang-outang.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Greek mythology A male companion of Pan or Dionysus with the tail of a horse and a perpetual erection.
  • noun Roman mythology A faun.
  • noun A lecherous man.
  • noun Any of various butterflies of the family Satyridae, having brown wings marked with eyelike spots; a meadow brown.
  • noun obsolete The orangutan.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun man with strong sexual desires
  • noun one of a class of woodland deities; attendant on Bacchus; identified with Roman fauns

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English satire, from Old French, from Latin satyrus, from Greek saturos.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French satyre, from Latin satyrus, from Ancient Greek σάτυρος (saturos), from Hebrew שָׂעִיר (śaʿîr).

Examples

  • His eyes, under massively arched brows, were wide apart and black with the blackness that is barbaric, while before them was perpetually falling down a great black mop of hair through which he gazed like a roguish satyr from a thicket.

    WHEN GOD LAUGHS

  • Yes, Drew, our modern idea of the satyr is the Greek image conflated with the Italic deity of Faunus, who had the horns and goat legs.

    Pan and Satyrs

  • The man was quite right, and the satyr was a fool.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • He had smiled grimly on being described as a satyr!

    From the Housetops

  • I therefore, as I could not be accused of an outrage to modesty, permitted myself to maintain what might be invidiously termed a satyr-like watch from behind a forward flinging willow, whose business in life was to look at its image in a brown depth, branches, trunk, and roots.

    The Gentleman of Fifty

  • I therefore, as I could not be accused of an outrage to modesty, permitted myself to maintain what might be invidiously termed a satyr-like watch from behind a forward flinging willow, whose business in life was to look at its image in a brown depth, branches, trunk, and roots.

    Complete Short Works of George Meredith

  • I therefore, as I could not be accused of an outrage to modesty, permitted myself to maintain what might be invidiously termed a satyr-like watch from behind a forward flinging willow, whose business in life was to look at its image in a brown depth, branches, trunk, and roots.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Works of George Meredith

  • The cook wanted to chase him out with a meat cleaver, but steward held him back saying that the satyr was a guest of the king.

    Storynory - Stories For Kids

  • The cook wanted to chase him out with a meat cleaver, but steward held him back saying that the satyr was a guest of the king.

    Storynory - Stories For Kids

  • The satyr is the god of the party, of letting go and letting flow.

    Wrong Planet Asperger / Autism Forums

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • ...seeing about you us becoming slowly

    satyrs and tenuous shadows gathering

    for your committed final Bacchanal.

    - Peter Reading, Mnemonic, from For the Municipality's Elderly, 1974

    June 22, 2008