Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun One that scorches.
  • noun Informal An extremely hot day.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Anything that burns or parches; anything that is very hot: as, this day has been a scorcher.
  • noun Anything caustic, biting, or severe: as, that critique was a scorcher.
  • noun One who rides very fast on a bicycle or in a motor-car.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • Informal a very hot day.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun literally One who, or that which, scorches.
  • noun colloquial A very hot day.
  • noun soccer A very good goal, notably made with a very hard shot

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an extremely hot day
  • noun a very hard hit ball

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

scorch +‎ -er

Examples

  • However, the welcome is warm and the wine list is a scorcher, which is not surprising since owner Tim Luther's background is in wine importing.

    Home

  • In particular, the reader pointed out this passage, which proves that the guy hunched over his aerobars on the recreational path , the person who races you on your commute, and the charity ride racer all share a common ancestor called the "scorcher:"

    Up in the Air: The Dangers of Cycling

  • Now look Victorian bloke, you can say what you will about my "lack of mental control" but the fact is that this 'scorcher' and his Brompton took the Southwark Bridge KoM points from a guy on a Bianchi this morning.

    Up in the Air: The Dangers of Cycling

  • Ecirtec manufactures a seed conditioner similar in construction to the CeCoCo 'scorcher'.

    Chapter 9

  • If you are a "scorcher" and are out to pass everything you meet, the less weight you carry the better time you can make.

    Healthful Sports for Boys

  • To-day the automobile, which fears not hills, take invariably the Moulins road, and covers the distance between breakfast and dinner; that is, if the driver is a "scorcher;" and there are such in France.

    The Automobilist Abroad

  • He also never failed to overtake any "scorcher," although many of these were professional riders who deliberately violated the law to see if they could not get away from him; for the wheelmen soon get to know the officers whose beats they cross.

    VI. The New York Police

  • Mary Magdalen either walked or rode a mule Aspasia was a "scorcher," but she couldn't "coast."

    The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 1.

  • He also never failed to overtake any "scorcher," although many of these were professional riders who deliberately violated the law to see if they could not get away from him; for the wheelmen soon get to know the officers whose beats they cross.

    Theodore Roosevelt; an Autobiography

  • If PopSci is right, and Merriam Webster is incomplete, via the word chauffeur we can link together Ray LaHood, the Robber of the Rhine, speeding motorists, and 'scorcher' cyclists.

    Quickrelease.tv

Comments

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  • Used by the tabloid press to describe a day or a series of consecutive days when the temperature rises above 25 degrees.

    As in: " PHEW WHAT A SCORCHER!"

    February 5, 2008

  • Usually with 'Flaming June!' the day before.

    February 5, 2008